Fifty Ways to Reach Your Learners Using UDL as a Guide

In this fast-paced and playful webinar, Judith Schoonover and Sally Norton-Darr propose more than 50 strategies to ACCESS information using UDL as a guide. Scaffolds created or displayed with “everyday technologies” such as mobile technology, commonly used software, web-based tools, and classroom manipulatives provide a multitude of creative opportunities in which learners can thrive. Get the PowerPoint Slides here.

Transcript: 

- [Moderator] I'd like to welcome you to today's CTD Webinar on 50 ways to reach your learners using UDL as a guide. Our presenters are Judith Schoonover and Sally Norton Darr. We've got a packed presentation today. So I'm not gonna spend any more time introducing it I'm gonna let Judith and Sally take over and thanks very much.

- [Sally] Hey, everybody, how are you? This is Sally. Thank you for joining us. I see somebody from New Zealand, how 'bout that? Awesome for you to take this time. I know this is a busy time of year for you. And we wanna show you a good time. First we wanna thank Center on Technology and Disability and tell you that if you haven't been to their site, we have resources for you, but their resources are awesome. You can search by audience, you can search by language. It's a rich, rich, rich bank of resources that is certainly worth your scrolling through more than once. They offer all of us great resources to do our jobs better. So I wanna thank them for including us today.

- [Judith] Absolutely, this is Judy. We've tried to provide you today with some no-cost and easily accessible materials for shoestring budgets, because we all know how tight our budgets are. We are real fans of using what we've got, or as Caroline Musselwhite has said, dancing with the girl you brought.

- [Sally] Right, we've got a jam packed session for you today. And we want you to know that we want you to buckle up because it's gonna be fast, wild thrill ride of resources. Andthere we go. So there will be a survey at the end, as you see. And some of the resources that we've given you, Todd, if you wanna bring out that first handout, I'll show them what they've got to go by, because it will be a fast-paced adventure ride today. And I wanna show you that while that's coming up, you'll see on our slide there, we used Wordle, and that's our first good resource. But this is one of your handouts that you'll receive today and as you see, we have a picture of the slide and then all the resources that go along with the slide next to it, if you can see that. So those are all active links. And it's only 17 pages long, so no worries, right? And we will get to as many of them as we can, hopefully all of them, but if we miss, if we run out of time, rest assured that you've got those available to you in the first handout. So we can close that out, Todd. Thank you. I almost wished we had a Tom Petty song for you today, but we can't do you like that.

- [Judith] So we wanted to make this fun and kind of UDL-ish, so there will some visuals. There'll be some music and some really bad singing and rhyming. So with our apologies to Paul Simon, ♪ UDL's not hard to implement ♪ ♪ They've said to me. ♪

- [Sally] Okay, here's our first set of resources. And you can see we've got about four or five on here. And if you don't about CAST, that should be your first off if you wanna learn about UDL, for the Center for Applied Special Technologies. Oh, my goodness. Well, that picture right there is a terrific introductory video. But they are paired with the National Center on Universal Design for Learning and that site is incredible. It has lesson plans, has learning plans, has step-by-step guides to take you through all the principles of UDL and the practice of UDL. One of the resources there we have is the UDL toolkit from Karen Janowski and That is well worth exploring as well. That's a wiki that you can search by type of resource you need. And she has a lot of great suggestions for all learners. Finally is the free book, I would say book in quotes, because it's really an educational experience at the Universal Design for Learning, which is available to you for free on the site and that is also listed on your handouts. ♪ Providing access reflects the pillar ♪ ♪ One, two, three. ♪

- [Sally] All right, so these are the pillars of Universal Design for learning, as you may or may not know. It's research based in neuroscience that learning is accomplished by engaging the three networks of the brain and those are pictured there, the how, the why and the what of learning. And the principles are laid out for us to work our way through and to really begin to adapt our curriculum for the learner, not the other way around. So it's a new way to look at the curriculum. And we wanna show you some ways to do that easily with our slideshow. ♪ Use a blueprint of diversity ♪

- [Sally] That is is from Dave Edyburn. We've included a couple really nice research articles from Dr. Edyburn, who's in Florida. He's a great resource in himself, but we need to look at our learners in a variety of ways. And it's really a practical and a proactive approach to teaching that we take with UDL. The other thing you'll see on that resource list for this slide is the Iris Center, which has self-study modules and professional development. And if you need to know more about or want to know more about UDL, that's another great place to go. It's learning professional development module. But you can see of the things that Dr. Edyburn wants us to consider in adjusting our curriculum for our diverse learners that we have today. ♪ There must 50 ways to teach all learners ♪ ♪ 50 ways to reach all learners ♪

- [Sally] Don't you love it? Judy's gonna be selling CDs at the end, by the way, in case you're interested. But the first thing I wanna talk about here is the National Center on Accessible and Educational Materials. And that is a great site for... It has a AIM navigator and an AIM explorer, so it not only helps you... It simulates what learners might need and how you can reach those resources, how you can achieve getting those resources for your students. And then there's a simulation for students to go through on different kinds of text-to-speech and highlighting. And it's an interactive tool that facilitates the process of decision-making around instructional material and a simulation tool that combines grade-level digital text with access features common to most. So it's a really nice little all-in-one place to learn more about accessible educational materials and to explore them on your own, because I think it's a pretty confusing topic when, what does it mean? Only textbooks? Does it mean worksheets? You know, what does it mean when we talk about accessible educational materials. And I think that National Center really explains it very well. The other site that we've pictured on here is from Alberta and has a great wonderful resources for professional development and all sorts of media for learning more, engaging our learners and all our learners. And you can see some of that. It's learning supports and learning needs and the resources are given to us on that site in a UDL fashion. So there's things to read, or things to watch, or things to listen to. So it's really, really wrapped up in one package.

- [Judith] Okay, all of you out there in webinar land, everybody sing along with me ♪ Self regulation helps your learners to engage ♪ And if you see on this slide, we've got several suggestions on self-regulation activities. The Center for Social and Emotional Foundations of Early Learning, which is funded by Head Start has those little cute relaxation thermometers and feelings wheels that you see at the bottom of the slide.

- [Sally] And I just added that link there.

- [Judith] We also have wheel for problem solving. And if you Google those, you'll find at least a half a dozen of those in Google Images. And you can click on each one of those. And each one of those will take you to a website that suggestions on how to use the wheels in different ways. UDL for self-regulation and scholastic site suggest books that go along with the self-regulation aspects and also suggests books on bullying and some of the things that cause us to lose our ability to self-regulate at the time. The other worksheet that you see on the slide there is from worksheetplace.com. And it breaks down a plan of action because some of our kids really work hard at self-regulation, but they're unable to maintain focus on their goals, or they're unable to maintain their behavior. So this helps them break it down into manageable steps and gives them a plan of action. And it's also a piece of that self-determination that we work so hard on creating for our students so that they're not dependent on others for their self-regulation skills. ♪ Recruit their interest with more activities than page ♪ We know that when students are presented with relatable real-life problems, they're often more engaged. And so we have activities that in some of our schools that the authentic learning and the problem-based learning approach, where students are presented things like, for instance, right now the horrible crisis in Puerto Rico. This is an authentic read to life problem that students can wrap their heads around. What if there's no water? What if there's not enough food? And this can lend itself to real thought-provoking discussions, great electronic searches and so on. And so that's the whole aspect of UDL that's so exciting is that proactive approach and finding things that students can link into and become engaged with. And the sky's the limit when you have captured them. ♪ Find books and text appropriate to their age ♪

- [Sally] So here's some ways to engage our learners. I know that we strive for inclusion and indeed we will find inclusion often, but sometimes what we see we find, Judy and I both work in the public schools, and we will see that our students have been included, but sometimes while the rest of the class is discussing the American Revolution, our friends are sometimes in the back reading Clifford the Big Red Dog. And that's kind of a shame, because we can adapt the curriculum for all learners. And these are some suggestions on how we can do that. Tumble Book Cloud, our public library has a subscription to. And that's certainly ages and all levels of text available in a variety of formats, audio as well. But if you don't subscribe to that, or if your school district doesn't subscribe to that... I think actually our whole state has a subscription from the state library. But if you also don't know about Tarheel Reader, there are some terrific exemplar text and we've given you the resource for that. Tarheel Reader is a fabulous resource in very many ways but people can create their own books about curriculum and they're read aloud and switch activated. And they can be as complex or as simple as need to be for your learner. And, finally, there' stacks, and that's from Scholastic Books, which is a great way to adapt the curriculum for different kinds of learners. ♪ There must be 50 ways to engage them ♪ ♪ 50 days to engage them ♪ And I don't hear any of you singing along with me, seriously. So we're gonna go into some of those little verses that go along with the 50 ways, so we want you to scaffold to meet the needs of any age stage. And as you can see by the slide, there's a lot of examples of scaffolding strategies. The Universal Design for Learning Center uses a bike with the training wheels as an example of scaffolding. Sometimes you need the training wheels to ride the bike and they can be removed. Other times you don't need the training wheels or they can be removed eventually. Sometimes you always need the training wheels. But regardless, when we scaffold with training wheels, you get to go where you want to go. So we really encourage you to explore the various scaffolding strategies that we've shared with you. There's the Edutopia Scaffolding Strategies, there's How to Scaffold Text for Struggling Readers and 12 Ways to Scaffold Text for Students, along with a website of infographics, because, as you can see, from this slide, from MsHouser.com, she used infographics, so she used both visuals and diagrams and text to describe the scaffolding.

- [Sally] I just wanna hop in here, not to confuse Judy, and say that thank you for adding in the resources that you are, that is wonderful. And I encourage anybody that has... We are, as you can tell, pretty informal here, so if you wanna chime in off of what you're using for any one of these strategies, please, by all means, do.

- [Judith] Absolutely. So the next strategy is graphic organizers can be handy, Sandy. And we have several graphic organizers that are displayed on the next slide. And they include foldables, they include a cause and effect chart, they include ready-made scaffolding, or graphic organizers that can be found online. And they also include SmartArt. So there's a variety of ways of modeling this that are just visual or they are manipulative. The one at the bottom we're especially fond of, this is one of our graphic organizers that kind of sets a story, it outlines a story and alludes, it's called a storytelling rope, but it alludes to the fact that you can tell a story, or you can organize a story with a familiar activity so the setting is the football stadium, the characters are the football players, the action is the kickoff and then there's three different balls or three different activities that occur. And then at the end, the conclusion of the story is the trophy winning. So, again, there's a number of different ways of organizing information, so a student can either write a story, tell a story or recall a story.

- [Sally] We had question that I just wanted to address about secondary education and that it's hard to adapt to the curriculum at the secondary stage, but you can still provide multiple means of representation and engagement and still do UDL within the curriculum by providing audio text and different ways for the folks to express themselves. But I'm gonna let the audience answer your question as well, Alice, thank you. The other thing that you might consider is the Quiet Listener both has quality indicators for assistive technology that are standard ones, but they also have them for post-secondary education. So you can visit the quiet indicators to see the aspects of post-secondary educations that are considerations and the Quiet indicators not only give the students the opportunity to share what kind of learning environment they require, but it gives the educators at post-secondary educational facilities a way of evaluating how they're teaching and considering other ways. And thank you, Anna Maria for posting that. So we also wanna talk about making connections with a theme, team. And we provided you with several websites. And we've also provided you with a thematic literacy planner that Todd's gonna bring over so we can examine that a little bit more closely. Sally, and a couple of our other colleagues from Loudoun County, and I did a presentation at ATIA. And we created the STEAM planner that anchors the theme with a book. And while this looks kinda horsey-ducky, it's real pretty and colorful and primary, it really does pull in from any grade level if you consider it, because you're gonna consider the concept and vocabulary. You're going to look at where science fits in, where technology fits in, whether you're gonna make something that helps exemplify the learning activity, whether there's gonna be an art project, a math project, what kinds of skilled movement might come into play, what kinds of social studies or social awareness, what kinds of cultural activities might be considered, communication opportunities, what kinds of writing supports and what kind of assistive technology might be required when you are presenting this lesson so that everyone's considered. It ties in beautifully with Edyburn's Blueprint of Diversity. It's a way of considering the learners and then implementing a learning environment that they can all respond to. We do have a couple of websites on this slide as well that kind of pull those themes together. And then we've got a couple of examples of some of our lit kids that we have created here in Loudoun County where we might have a theme. I think the one up at the top is Go Away Big Green Monster. So we've talked about the story, we've talked about some math activities, there's some matching activities, there's also a writing activity and there's strategies for how to trap your monster. So there's different ways depending on the age level of bringing a theme into an activity in order to make the learning more well-rounded. Also let them learn on the move. There's been more and more studies that indicate that learners don't learn as well without movement breaks. So the little girl on the left-hand side of your slide is reading a fanny book. So that's a book that's simply been taken apart. It's been laminated with spaces in between, where this young lady can scooch on her bottom between the pages and read her book. She can scooch forward or backward. Someone who uses a chair for mobility could be in the chair and move the chair forward or backward. It could be hopped upon. Also, learning furniture, balls and standing desks and other things can be helpful for students to learn. And we're just loving some of the playground and recess activities that we've seen recently, where there's calculators on the playground or the states, and students can explore the various United States by walking around. So those are just a couple of examples of learning on the move. And I'm sure a lot of you can come up with other examples on learning on the move.

- [Sally] I'm loving this active chat here. I'm getting carried away reading this.

- [Judith] Okay, so CAST is a one stop shop. So if you have not spent some time on the Center for Applied Specialized Technology, please do yourself a favor and get over there and check those out. We don't have time to talk about all of these, but these are all free. Some of them require a login, and once you created the login, some of those resources that Sally showed you at the beginning, like teaching every learner, those are books, that book, is available online. The same login that accesses that book can access these resources. I'm just gonna highlight one of them, the UDL exchange, it's free. All you do, again, is create a username and password, which is good for all the CAST logins and you can select from various topics, English, language arts, math, science and social studies and see lesson plans that have been created by others. Stacy wants to know why I'm still not singing. Okay, I'm sorry. Relate to the theme and add, Chad! I was so taken aback that somebody really wanted to hear my voice that I just lost track. We have been huge fans of Marilyn Burns work, and making connections to math by way of literacy. And, again, this is really just thinking about a theme like you can either do a book that is specific for math like Circumference, but also Alexander Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday, Mouse Count. There's any number of books and there's many, many, many booklets online that you can Google. There's many Pinterest websites that you can check out that talk about the books that really lend themselves beautifully to math. Our math lit kits will contain an adapted book, they'll contain the math tools that pertain to that particular math scene in the book and they will also have lesson plans. And really once you get going, it's such fun to do that the sky's the limit.

- [Sally] Yes, I've been watching the chat and I'm really thrilled that all of you are participating. And I see we have a really diverse group of people listening as well as the pit folks that you work with. We specifically work with preschool to 21-year-old, but I think we're offering resources that'll apply to any age. And some of them you'll see here on this site. Not only the Center for Technology and Disability, but also these are more of the CAST free learning tools. I'm gonna tell about the UDL additions which is actually flexible curriculum. And there's classic literature that are broken down with as-you-need it support. So it goes, the one I was looking at today was going through the Gettysburg Address. And if you needed more support, as you were going through that, that you could click on it and get indications of different types of literature or what it was referring to, or literary structure that was used in the speech. And I think that UDL editions is certainly worth looking into and maybe applied to some of the older students that you're working with as well.

- [Judith] Use old things to make things new, Lou. I'm a great scrounger, a great Goodwill attender and a great dollar store person. And there are so many tools that are already available that are under-used or could be reused in new ways. I used to teach elementary school and one of my favorite things to do with my students was to cut coupons and to create real-life math activities. I'd bring in the product, I'd show them coupon, we do math activities that have to do with addition and subtraction. For those kids that needed additional technology, we used coinulators or real coins to come up with different math problems. But you can do this for anything. I've seen classrooms measure the waist in the cafeteria. I've seen classrooms create a garden or do something with a lost and found. But they're using the things that they find around the school environment and they're creating learning activities that lend themselves to real-life pre-vocational skills at the same time. So, again, before you throw things out, think about how they can be used in different ways to support learners. We did have a question on the contents of the math lit kit, so I've just pulled one of ours. And I'm going to type up the table of contents. Thanks for asking.

- [Sally] So we're back to the free learning tools at CAST, just because we can't stress enough how wonderful they are. And for those of you at any level, the lesson builder is a great resource that really helps educators design lessons of study to meet the diversities that then challenges. So it really leads you through the process of how to think about your lesson in a UDL kind of fashion. And that's really for any age. So these CAST tools are really fabulous. They've been around for awhile. The folks at CAST are just so receptive as well. We were lucky enough to work with them awhile back on Bookbuilder, which we'll talk about later. But, you know, they listen to your suggestions. If it's not quite working out, they'll listen to your suggestions, because they know that you're working with the students out in the schools. And they'll tweak their tools to meet your needs. It's really a fabulous bunch of people. There's probably an app for that, SNAP. Here's some ways to investigate that. We're not spending a lot of time on apps today, and I know that's a pretty popular way to intervene and reach learners. But I want to give you some ways to search. There's just so many apps that I'm sure we've missed your favorite. But if you want to look for more, I would advise you to go some of these that are listed in your resource. So the first, the one on the right is the UDL Placemat, which really breaks the apps down by the three pillars of UDL. So you'll see apps for multiple means of representation, expression and engagement and, yes, action and engagement. And also there's a search engine called Bridging Apps, so if you're looking for a particular need, you can go to the search engine called Bridging Apps to look for what you're looking for and then call this call center from Scotland has some really great fabulous wheels of pedagogy. And there's actually a wheel of pedagogy for dyslexia that will pinpoint apps that they've tested out and find appropriate for all learners and for learners that are having difficult reading or different things. Really, the call center is a great resource for a lot of different things. Okay, my friends, we're gonna start speeding things up so we can get through is. So let them respond with a label, Mabel. There's practical alternatives to writing. They may include manipulatives, file folder games and use of Avery labels. And as you can see here, we've got sentence-building and word-building with Avery labels. We can have sign-ins for kids who can't write their name so they can participate like everyone else. Drawn an essay with a crayon, Stan. We need to give choices for our students. Do they really need to do it just the same way as everyone else. So not only would I allow them to draw it with a crayon, but I would also allow them to have other ways of expressing what they learned. And we've given you, on your resources, not only how to make really big crayons for kids that have difficulty holding crayons, and letting them color and write with them, but we've also given you some suggestions for how students can make a different choice to still show what they know. Oh, I love paint chips. How many of you are using paint chips in your classroom or with your students. There are a number of ways that paint chips can help illustrate different activities. They are such visual things. I feel like these are just such a great example of action and expression. How cool is it that they can provide a visual means of indicating the intensity from a light vocabulary word to an intense one. They can also be used as graphic organizers and vocabulary builders, or just plain word family activities. So just listen to me, I'm tell you a whole bunch of different ideas and things that you can do. Multiple means of representation that call to the multiple intelligences. The handouts that we gave to you that pertains to this particular activity has to do with characteristics of auditory learners. Also we've given you a list of books with repeated lines because sometimes that's what reinforces the understanding. If you look at the top left-hand corner, some of you may have had one of these in your old closet. They are the califones or the language masters, where you can record text on a magnetic strip and play it. For some of the kids, it's not only the listening, but it's the kinesthetic activity of pushing that card through the card reader, watching it move. Not only can you put text on it, and not only can you record, but you can have real objects that provide labeling for students that are uncertain of what that object is. Also in the middle bottom part of the slide, we have a picture of the Brown Bear, Brown Bear book. And we actually created a PowerPoint story with the Brown Bear book by scanning the pages. But then we embedded it with sign language class, actually signed the words to Brown Bear, Brown Bear. So a student could watch the PowerPoint and see the text signed for them.

- [Sally] We have Talking Photo Album, which has been a fun thing, too, that was on that slide, that you might look into. That's been a real fun, versatile tool that we use that's not assistive technology, but it becomes assistive technology.

- [Judith] So we want you to cook up some learning fun, son. And, again, another alternative for representation and action and expression is the ability to manipulate by saying no to worksheets and pencil and paper tasks and saying yes to magnetic words, magnetic letters, magnetic numbers. We've created, or we've included a couple of resources on ready-made cookie sheet activities, under the title Cookie Sheet Challenge, and then also the magnetic poetry website. Show them on a wheel, Shaquille. We have found that these learning wheels that are graphic organizers that can be created in a PowerPoint slide, they can be Googled and found online. There are foldables that have multilevels of wheels These are all different ways of teaching concepts or organizing information. Some of our favorite places to go to for these wheels are Sparkle Box. They're always the resource that CVC Word Wheels, those are all from Sparkle Box. There is a PowerPoint wheel template, where you can you own text and materials. And then we've collected word wheels. We also are going to provide you with the UDL wheel, which is a manipulative that you can cut out and put together so you can actually manipulate those three pillars and see the different resources that fall under each of those.

- [Sally] Yes, and we're gonna give you that. It used to be a terrific online interactive site, but just recently disappeared. We're hoping it comes back soon. What we'll do is give you a paper version in the link in the chat, for you to cut out and make your own of UDL.

- [Judith] And, Tandra, thanks for asking about foldables. I do believe we have some additional foldable resources on another one of our pages that talks about foldables. So we will get back to that, too. So thanks for asking. So let them read it again, Jenn. And, again, as Sally was talking to you about the Talking Photo Album, it's a great resource for conversation starters, for what happened at school, for following directions or recording directions for task completion. So we've given you a couple of how-tos for using Talking Photo Albums, including tips for home and school, and then a resource for finding Talking Photo Albums. We're curious as to how you might have used a Talking Photo Album. So please put that in the chat. Cook up a recipe. I know that while we often can't cook in schools anymore, because of dietary restrictions and allergies, you can also create the same kind of following recipe templates for following other kinds of construction activities, whether it's an art activity or making some sort of dough or goop for science. There are a lot of visual recipe websites online, especially for those of you that are working for students who have life skill goals. The easiest way of finding some of these is to just Google them. Pinterest, again, has fabulous, fabulous resources. If any of you are using Unique Learning or News to You, you get a recipe every week. So those are just a few examples and we can just spend a whole day talking about recipes and visuals, but we need to move on.

- [Sally] Thanks, Tandra, for your suggestion about Talking Photo Album. That's actually how I got my job here. Isent somebody was working at the team a link to Talking Photo Albums and I said, "Could you use something like this?" And they thought that was innovate enough to get me a job on the Assistive Technology Team, so that's pretty cool. Yeah, I think there's a thousand uses for them. And collect them at Christmas time when they're on sale and then see how many ways you could use them. We could scaffold our learning in so many different ways. And it doesn't have to be a special website, it doesn't have to be a special app. Many of the things we have around the house can also be used to scaffold our learning. There are some free websites here. Audicity is a great free site for sound effects and for recording your voice. But sometimes if the students can't read, they can provide the sound effects to the story and that engages them as well. And Microsoft Word has a read-aloud for anything on Microsoft Word. It's a tool in the toolbar that will help you read any text on Word. So think about how you can use your digital camera, think about Google's tools, like voice typing and things like that. So you have so many tools at your fingertips that are free that I think making recordings and finding ways to represent and express in a variety of ways. ♪ So scaffold made with every day technology ♪ ♪ Can improve functional ability ♪ ♪ Buy for a buck or find manipulatives that are free ♪

- [Sally] Judy's our queen of the dollars store and you can see some of her products here. So she is a great scavenger. I'm looking at a collection right now in the room we're broadcasting from. But what she did was take, on the right is Frog Tape. Our boss had just repainted his house and brought in all these great little containers of Frog Tape and she used a combination of clothespins to keep in the container, but also use to match up with the number on the top of the container. You can see for yourself there's other things that are bought from the dollar store, Legos for building words and the puzzle. When you put the put the puzzle together by balancing, you'll see the puzzle made up of tongue depressors. So there's always ways to, you don't need a big budget. ♪ There must be 50 ways to provide access. ♪ ♪ Nifty ways to provide access ♪ And we're doing singing again.

- [Sally]So, make a movie to explain, Jane. These are getting to be so easy to make now. We used to have fancy, like Microsoft Photo Store used to be contained in Windows and Microsoft Word. And I think you could still download it for free. But so many kids are not familiar with Instagram and all the video modeling that we have, or video recording that we have right on our phones. That's a great way to get kids to express themselves. Ijust read across some that my own kids have made in middle school and they are a riot just to hold onto as well. But it was a truly a side of my kids I had never seen before, but when they had to act out something about... Oh, something in social studies. It was just a riot. I ran across it in our old recordings. It really brings out a side of your students. And it's a way to tap into their knowledge base that doesn't involve pencil and paper and I think that's important as well. You'll see some resources on that as well, from video modeling and making videos in your classroom on our resource guide. Another way is to have them listen to stories. And I'm a big fan of audio books. I like to take walks in the morning now sometimes. And I actually worked my way through Pride and Prejudice. I couldn't believe it. After all these years, I finally got through Pride and Prejudice on audio. So that may be a way to hook your readers as well. What was really hard for me to engage in that old English dialogue. I could listen to it and understand. But I finally made it to the end and found out what happened to Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy. But I encourage to use those kinds of tools for your students as well. And there certainly are lots and lots of available. We've listed some on your resource sheet. But literacy zone is a nice one because it really has combed through a lot of different other resources. And it's not all for elementary students. Open Culture is a way to... Has videos on culture as well as literature. So I'm gonna move ahead, 'cause I know we're running slow here. The comic strips are a great way to engage students as well. You can see that I think the daunting full page to fill up in text is sometimes hard for students, but if all they have to do is fill up a speech bubble, you'll find some great resources. And if you go to Make Beliefs Comic, which is on your list, you'll find actually a special section for special education as well. So well worth looking into. Vocabulary, to fill up your vocabulary, there's some great sites. There's a visual thesaurus. There's also the Frayer Model up in the right, but the visual thesaurus will actually give you related words. The one on the bottom right provides an audio as well as a video of what the word means. Really powerful way to learn a vocabulary. I think just words is one thing, but to hear it and to see it really brought it home and makes it easier to remember. There's also video flashcards available on that site. The Vocab Ahead is listed by grade level as well. And you could see students can do it on their own or you can work through sixth grade vocabulary, seventh grade vocabulary, all the way up. Noise, I said, is another way to enhance it and you can use Audacity to do that. There's also as you can... I'm sure noise has enhanced our listening experience today with Judy singing, but you'll never forget this webinar, will you? Because of the noise that we provided. But the library system also has a lot of times free music and free sounds for that sort of thing. Pictures, we know, are very important and for students to tell stories about what they've learned is a quite an engaging thing for them to do. There's a variety of tools here, but couple new ones you may not have heard about is Office Mix, which is the way to actually make lessons available online and interactive and Sway, which is an add-in to PowerPoint that can become very interactive as well. So worth exploring.

- [Judith] And don't forget, you can also use the narration aspect in PowerPoint so you can create a flow story at the same time.

- [Sally] Yeah, lots of times, myself included, it's that first sentence that's the hardest one to write when you have to write or express yourself, whether it's writing or expressing yourself. And here's some sites for great story prompts and sentence starters and things like that. And you'll find them on your resource sheet. Color is important as we'd like to... There are some resources there. But you know that you can also do that at any time on Microsoft Word. So if you're making your text accessible to your student, I know that color can make a big difference, both in background and in text as well. And those can all be changed for your student as they're writing or as they're reading. And it doesn't print out that color if you change the background on Microsoft Word. So that's important. I've seen drastic changes for a student who told me when I put a pink background on her text that she said that the letters stopped dancing. So just like that it's worth exploring. And I like for the students to explore that on their own and find out what font they like, what background color they like, and then just sorta set that as a template. This is the AIM Explorer I referred to earlier in the presentation. That's a free simulation that combines grade-level digital text with access to features that are found. So you can really test your student's ability to see what works best for them. ♪ Tools that feature versatility. ♪

- [Sally] This is the Osmo, which I just read this morning is now available on the iPhone. But really a fun learning tool that keeps growing and growing every day as far as games. And there's math and there's tangrams and there's reading and things like that, letter matching and things like that. But it's a fun tool that uses the iPad or the iPhone. ♪ Provide learners with new opportunities ♪

- [Sally] So this just shows you some ways that our students can demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways. We have a variety of students and a variety of ways for them to express themselves. ♪ To engage with learning communities ♪

- [Sally] We were wondering what you used to connect with each other. Judy and I did a presentation a couple winters ago when we had a huge snowstorm. She and I live about 30 miles apart and there was no way we were getting together. So we created the whole program I think on Google Hangouts, right? Mm-hm. I think we used Google Hangouts and we collaborated that way. But there's no reason, we have a worldwide audience right here, so I know this is one great learning platform that crosses the globe. But what do you all use that helps you connect with other people? ♪ There's more than 50 ways to teach all learners ♪

- [Sally] So here's some great ways to find visual supports. How important are visual supports to me? Tons of ways, thank you, Karen. I think I use visual supports more than anything. I think I really am a visual learner sometimes. But there's lots of free activities out there. And LessonPix is a paid subscription, but they have a great free sharing site as well. And as well as, what's it called? ResourceSETs from SET-BC, has terrific visual support, I mean, thousands of them that can be used. And we'll share that link with you as well. ♪ There must 50 ways to reach all learners ♪ ♪ 50 ways to teach all learners ♪ Okay, we're done singing again. Here we go. So collaborate and make a plan, Stan. We already talked about these collaboration tools. And we love the ideas that you guys have been putting in there. We've used things like Google Survey, and different things, different ways of giving immediate feedback. But you can also work, if you share folder in Google Drive, when you're not there at the same time. So please list some of the things. And thank you so much for continuing to list things like LiveBinder, we see LessonPix and Zoom. These work for adults as well as for student collaborations. Put the story in box, Rox. We're not gonna go into detail. We have some information on story boxes, on how to collect materials to retell a story or to tell a story, which helps with understanding. It helps with memory and recalling. So we've got some nice tip sheets in your resources.

- [Sally] Oh, thank you so much for your contributions. I am learning so much just from reading the chat. Thank you, guys.

- [Judith] Help them to begin, Gin. And, again, we've got a list of different things that can help those writers that have that writing block, from story flips to balls, to cubes, to Read, Write, Think website and to story tools. So there's just a whole bunch of different things that you can use. And if you don't have time, make materials with a group. The link associated with this slide takes you to a collection of resources that are saved in Digo, which is like Pinterest without the pictures. And it's about different ways of creating adapted books.

- [Sally] Acting out is a great way to learn as well. And we've got some ideas here. There's Shakespeare in a Minute. And some great little preschoolers that are doing a carwash activity and a firefighter activity, but a great way to learn about those community helpers. I love this little... I just can tell, I'm talking faster. Rest assured that if we don't get through all the slides, they are all available on your handout. But this is a great little video on how somebody read using a Switch. And it uses a puppet, and it's really quite clever. And what Franz does is access Tarheel Reader that way through his Switch.

- [Judith] So we've gotten a couple of resources by Justin and Sofka about the fact that when there is embedded text in pictures, students remember the information faster. And they remember it longer. So keep in mind that you can either comic strip creators or you can look for graphic novels to help people who are visual learners. Puppets are the trick. Make sure that you give people different ways of action and expression They're not just for little ones. As you can see at the bottom, those are Harry Potter puppets.

- [Sally] We've already talked about these, I'm gonna skip right through that and talk about... This is Dave Edyburn and I wanna talk about Paul V, that's a picture of resources one of the speech pathologists used, up at the top. She scaffolded the text with a sticky note. So she just put over the text an easier version of the book they were reading. And I don't think we mentioned it before. I was gonna start to talk about the Paul V. Sherlock Center that is pictured as well. This is a great... I know I got through Honors English with Cliff Notes and now they're even bigger and better than ever. SparkNotes, Cliff Notes and Schmoop are great literacy summarizers. And you can actually,excuse me, you can use those and use the text compactor to simplify them even more. But we have video as well as text summaries of literary work. So these are three really good sites. We like the software tools of inspiration. I know that's not free, but thinking about graphic organizers and how there's some ideas, the background color of how we rescale using a thesaurus, a spell check, a find and replace, autocorrect, all the things that Microsoft Word can give us without even going outside to a website. We just used inspiration to show you that. But what it's really showing is what Microsoft Word will do for us.

- [Judith] And, again, Dave Edyburn came up with a way of auto-summarizing when Microsoft took that aspect out of the more current Microsoft Word versions. This is a free website and it's self-explanatory. So we'll just kinda move on here. Use Word or Windows recording features to sound record. And we've given you some directions on how to do that. You can create graphic organizers where students drop in their sound files in order to remember what they wanna say and then they can transcribe their stories.

- [Sally] Again, we're using Word here just like we talked about, but all different ways to think about scaffolding your text for your reader. And a great resource, great resource that summarizes all these Microsoft Words is from Florida. Lourdes Day created The Wonders of Word, which also has a nice chart in the back for whatever your learner needs, how those needs are addressed through Microsoft Word. So if you're a visual learner, you have organizational problems, how Word can help them. So I urge you to download that PDF, it's a dandy.

- [Judith] And if you haven't seen Rewordify, do yourself a favor and explore it. You'll see when you paste in sentences, you get a simplified version. When you click on the highlighted words, you're going to hear and learn the original word. They also create vocabulary lists based on the words that have been rewordified, and quizzes. There's also a section on classic literature that has been rewordified and simplified.

- [Sally] Right, thank you, Ynez. We said not only is that video literary summaries, but they have page by page translations of like Beowulf. Why couldn't I have used that back in the day, you know?

- [Judith] And just a reminder that pictures are really handy. And you can use tables as a means of kind of explaining something in a much simpler low-text way. Also different ways of making sure that things are readable to your learners who do not read at grade level. You can use a free online thing called Free Text Readability Consensus Calculator. It takes text that you've inputted and it looks at seven different readability scales. And then, of course, you can use the readability in Microsoft Word, not only to evaluate your stuff but to have students evaluate their own work and add vocabulary words to increase the reading level of their written work.

- [Sally] Yeah, Book Builder by CAST is a great free online tool that'll add... You can add your own illustrations as well as coaches to help guide the learner. And it's all ages. And there's 3,000 in the library now available. But you can also make your own, which is a great way to engage our learners. I wish I could tell you more, but please go there and look at it. Amazon use to offer, and I think they still do, something called Concordance, which lists the 100 most important words in text. I don't know that it's available on all text, but it was a kind of a neat feature that they had when you see it inside called Concordance.

- [Judith] Consider tools that provide accessibility. We're gonna sing any more, we're over that. But we wanna make sure that you provided tools that have different means of accessibility. And you're gonna look at some of the different resources that we've go listed and we've got some pictures, too. You were asking about Wonders of Word, it's also a link on slide number 64. So in your handout you'll find that you're linked to the most current version of Wonders of Word. So these are some of those accessibility tools we've talked about. We, I think, have included the PVC book on how to make some different things like a easel, like handles for holding things. You can see that there's mouse adaptations to make it easier to access the computer, et cetera.

- [Sally] Yeah, engagement also includes access so that's important for our learners.

- [Judith] So when you do this, you allow learners to be free to show you 50 ways they learn the content, 50 ways they've earned the content. And just a quick thing. The picture on the left is a leprechaun, or the right, is a leprechaun track. And that's how this teacher chose to have the students demonstrate their knowledge of simple machines.

- [Sally] So we also think tactile things are important and you'll see some samples there, some squishy books and you do have resources for that as well.

- [Judith] And those are the tips for home and school from the Nevada Sensory Impairment Project. And also there's another site called, and I'll type it in, because it didn't get included in our resources, it's called tactilebooks.org. And I'll type that in. Page fluffers sure are keen, Jean. We've given you some directions on how to create some simple page fluffers so that students can turn pages on their own. And then let them fold it to explain, Blaine. And those are where we have some of our foldables resources. So we didn't forget those wonderful manipulatives that help learners learn by touching things.

- [Sally] So now we can take a look at our third handout. It's our own little mini-book that we provided for you. This is gonna be a quick peek. But you can see that you now have your own mini-book handout. I guess it's not gonna come over, but that's okay. We need to sift through anyway. It's one of your handouts. And you'll see when it's folded up you get your own mini-book, oh, there we come. Students get a kick out of having their own personal little book. And you can tailor these for any topic. This one happens to be on our topic today. But you'll see how to use UDL and some of our suggestions that we've had here. So what you do isfollow the directions that you'll see. And there's a YouTube on how to fold a mini-book. But you'll end up with a, it's one sheet of paper that when folded up just is a nice eight page little mini-book. Thank you, Todd. All right.

- [Judith] Drag and drop instead of write, Dwight. We've given you a website for a page with vocabulary that you can drag and drop into poetry. And you can also create a drag and drop activity in PowerPoint. And we've given you the directions to do that.

- [Sally] Yeah, we don't want you to reinvent the wheel. We've talked about all these things already. Oh, actually, I didn't talk about Baltimore City. The Paul V. Sherlock Center is really for all ages up until, to adults. And Baltimore City Public Schools has adapted 755 storybooks and textbooks with video support, premade, all ready, ready to roll. So what a great bonanza that is. These are some ways to make it easier to see. We talked about colored overlays, but an easel is important to bring those things up at a eye level for many students. But there's also good reading guides that you can make to help mask some of the distracting information for our students.

- [Judith] And, again, here are some other masking things. We have included a reading guide that can be replicated on transparency film so that students can try out the different colors, as well as directions on those little focus sticks that are just adorable to make and to use. ♪ "So the problem is all inside your head" she said to me ♪ ♪ The answer is easy if you take it logically ♪ ♪ We hope we helped you to continue to see ♪ ♪ There must be fifty ways to teach our students ♪ ♪ 50 ways to reach our students ♪ Yay, we made it! We did it!

- [Sally] So we're gonna stick around as long as you need us to be here. We're happy to answer questions. Oh,thank you, Ynez, for singing with us. Thank you for spending your afternoon with us. We know this is a busy time. We are, as I said, we'll stick around as long as you've got questions. I wanna thank you for contributing so heavily. I can't wait to get a copy of this chat to see all these great resources that are in there. And thank you, thank you, CTD, for inviting us to be part of this great afternoon.

- [Judith] And don't forget to fill out surveys. I'm sure Sally said that, but I was busy reading all the different comments in here. So fill out your surveys, please. There's a CTD survey. These surveys and your feedback help make these webinars possible. You have the opportunity to suggest other webinars as well. Please stick around, again, we will have wonderful discussions and we will continue to answer questions. And absolutely, Cheryl, Unique Learning Curriculum is fantastic, as in News 2 You. We've used that curriculum in here in Loudoun County.

- [Sally] Yes, you're welcome to share these resources. I mean, that's how we learn from each other. I said we had one of our... We're big fans of somebody that's attending here today, Ynez Peterson, and if you wanna Porta Portal, she's got a dandy bunch of resources for students with complex needs, and all students, really. But thank you, all. I see many people on our list of works that I know I've read, your works. And I appreciate you sharing with me and we're happy to share with you.

- [Todd] Okay, so this is Todd again. I wanna thank Judy and Sally for that bountious, excellent presentation. As they've been saying, we'll be posting this on the CTD website in the next day or so. And then we just wanna be mindful of people's time, so if you only had an hour for this, that's fine. We will post it the website. And we're also gonna have them stick around so you can put your questions in the chat box and we'll answer questions there. And outside of that, thanks, everybody, for coming. And we will be staying on for awhile for anybody that wants to continue to ask some questions or maybe even mention some other resources, thanks.

- [Sally] And we also wanna thank our friend, Stacy, for sitting here next to us and putting in all those resources when we needed them. So thank you, Stacy.

- [Stacy] You're welcome.

- [Judith] I'm going back and scrolling over the things that you've commented on that I didn't get a chance to read. And these are great. Thanks, Ynez. We can't wait to add them.

- [Sally] Yeah, thanks, Ynez for putting your website up, that's great.

- [Judith] Kristen, what does that mean? Alice, you're from out of the country, right? I've seen your work. Well, Nashville, Tennessee is definitely out of this country.

- [Sally] It is country, that's right.

- [Judith] It is.

- [Sally] We saw folks from New Zealand here, folks from Bogota, Colombia, any other? You guys came in quickly. It's really thrilling to share our knowledge this way globally. Not just my knowledge, but the folks that are here, too.

- [Judith] Yeah, Kristen, you're right. I'm from California originally. So, yeah, it is its own kinda country. Whereabouts in California? Berkeley. Oh, I was in Lancaster and Palmdale. I was in the desert.

- [Sally] Scotland.

- [Judith]Kathleen, we love the call center.

- [Sally] Culpepper,yeah.

- [Judith] Okay, who has questions?

- [Sally] "Is there a resource list or is it just "the slides and handout?" There's four different handouts. One is our slide-by-slide, with places you can take notes. One is the mini-book. One is a thematic literacy planner. And the last 17-page one goes slide-by-slide with each of the resources. That's the one... It's called CTD 50 Ways Resources. And you'll find active links next to all the slides.

- [Judith] Alex, we love mini-books, too. Almost every presentation I do I have a mini-book that lists the resources. And we didn't get a chance to mention, but the mini-book also has links to other resources. Like there's a resource on how to make social stories. There's another one on Pocket Mods. And there is on Vicki Blackwell's website for making books, as well as Dinah Zike's Foldables resources.

- [Sally] So you'll have your own mini-book if you download that and put it together, too.

- [Judith] So, Alice, you're saying you have some students getting extra supports under a grant who get academic coaching at your community college. Thank you, Sue. I hope you enjoyed the webinar. And, Kristen, yes. One of the websites actually has a kind of a guide on certain disability categories and that isn't very politically correct for me to word it that way, but they found a correlation between certain color combinations and certain learning differences.

- [Sally] Hey, folks, could you-- Oh, okay. We just wanna make sure you do have four handouts. I was looking at another screen here that were only two. You see four handouts in your downloadable resources, right?

- [Judith] Dinah Zikes, Z-I-K-E-S.

- [Sally] Is it Z-I or Z-Y?

- [Judith] It's Z-I. And I don't think it has an S on the end, either. It's Zike. Okay, thanks, Susan. She sees four.

- [Sally] Good.

- [Judith] Anna Maria is going to respond from CTD about the handouts. Ynez indicates she had to download them one at a time. And that's just in case some of you don't have the chat format, if you're listening instead of reading it.

- [Sally] Yeah, and you know they'll post this all on their website by tomorrow anyway and all the resources will be there. This was really our pleasure. I'm gratified by how many people took time to spend it with us. And we appreciate it. We really appreciate CTD giving us the chance to all get together this afternoon, too.