Gathering STEAM: Planning for Inclusion with UDL

This information rich webinar offers educators an exploration of the lesson plan design. Using UDL principles framed by CCSS, Luis & Kendra use UDL principles to create more inclusive lesson designs that meet the academic needs of all learners. (Get the slides.)
 

Links: Resources for UDL lesson planning and PPT
Lesson on PBS Learning Media, which is used as the starting point for the webinar content.
 

Transcript: 

- [Voiceover] Good afternoon everyone, and welcome to the Center on Technology and Disability's webinar, Gathering Steam: Planning for Inclusion with UDL. Your featured speakers for this afternoon are Luis Perez and Kendra Grant. We ask that during this webinar you would please take out the time and click on the link to the survey here and share your thoughts with us and with that I'd like to turn the floor over to Kendra and Luis, thank you.

- [Luis] Alright, well thank you everybody for joining us today. We're really excited to be doing this webinar, and good afternoon if you're watching live, if you're joining us live, or if you're watching the recording, good morning, good evening, good night. No matter what time of the day it is, we're glad that you're joining us to learn more about UDL, Steam, and inclusion. My name is Luis Perez. I'm a digital inclusion consultant, based in St. Petersburg, Florida. You can find me on Twitter @eyeonaxs, that's A, X, S. My website is LuisPerezonline.com and as a digital inclusion consultant I focus on three areas, UDL, assisted technology, and then accessible content, and I believe those three areas, when you put them all together, really do a great job of creating a more equitable educational system. That's what I'm all about. My UDL journey, I am a person with a disability. I'm legally blind, and of course having accessible materials has played a key role in my educational journey. I have a Doctorate in Special Education and a Master's in Instructional Technology from the University of South Florida. However, I believe the greatest challenge that I face as a student, was that of being an English language learner, and coming to the United States at the age of 12, and having to adapt to a new culture, and I believe that's an area where UDL could have been really helpful. One of my goals as an educator is to make sure that other students, other learners, that follow me, are able to take advantage of UDL take advantage of the latest technology and get the most out of their education. With that I'm going to pass it over to my co-presenter, co-partner in crime, co-author Kendra, Grant, Kendra, I'll pass it over to you.

- [Kendra] Thank you Luis, thank you. My name's Kendra Grant, and I'm coming from Toronto, Ontario, today, and my background is in education. I was a teacher for about 25 years, and started using and looking at universal design for learning back in 2004, and brought it into my library program. We were looking at end core units, and how we could really meet the high needs that we had in our school, and all of our English language learners that we had. We had over 100 different languages represented in our school at the time, and it really was something that made sense to me. I'm glad today to be able to come with you to really look at deconstructing a lesson. I think it's going to be an interesting activity and I think it'll give us lots of insight into UDL. My other part of my background, is as a, I owned a professional development company of Portland, Oregon, and did a lot around the inclusion of technology into your practice and universal design for learning, and worked in a lot of different districts in the U.S. and in Canada, and I just finished my Masters of Educational Technology. That's that MET under my name. That's out of the University of British Columbia, and I focused on UDL, to teacher professional learning and e-learning. I'm looking forward to learning with you today and we hope everyone will be able to participate and give us their insights as well as we move forward.

- [Luis] Right and there's a saying that the smartest person in the room is the room, and so we're going to rely on you to make some contributions throughout the webinar. For that we're going to use the chat area over on the right side of your screen you're joining us on a computer, you'll see a chat area. I want to make sure everybody can find that. I want to pose a question for you, and the question is, the Olympics just ended, so in the chat area can you tell us what was your favorite moment of the Olympics? I'll give you a second to do that just to make sure that the chat area is something that's working for you. In the meantime, we've put together a number of resources for you, and rather than you trying to write all of these resources down, maybe missing a URL here and there, what we've done is created a collection on the website Participate Learning, and there are two ways you can get to that collection of resources. You can scan the QR code on the screen if you have a mobile device with you and you have a QR code app, or you can just use the URL which is bitly, B, I, T, dot, L, Y, and then /udllessonplanning. That's a short URL, it's gonna take you to a Participate Learning collection where you'll be able to access not only some of the videos and resources that we're gonna talk about, but also some documents that we've prepared for you so that you can do some of the activities, not just throughout the webinar, but also later on, when you're analyzing your own sessions. Let's see, it looks like everybody is finding the chat area, and sharing your key moments, or favorite moments from the Olympics. For me it was the two runners, where one fell, and then the other one came by and helped her on, and they both finished the race, and recently they got a medal, great!

- [Kendra] We always think alike Luis, that's what I posted.

- [Luis] I know. Sometimes we work together so much that we end up finishing each other's sentences. Awesome, thanks everybody for doing that. I say it throughout the session, we are gonna post some prompts for you, so we want to make sure you can contribute through the chat area. Speaking of prompts, one of the things that we try to do with universal design for learning, is be clear about the goal. I want to give you a minute or so to think about why are you joining us today? What is your goal in attending this session? And this is something that you should be modeling for your learner, is prompting them to reflect on their goals and their reasons for learning. If you could, in the chat area, go ahead, and we'll take a couple of minutes here, what is your goal for attending this session today? And we'll see what comes in as people are typing. What we want to do is make this more of a conversation, and by the way, that's something that is ideal for practice in UDL, and looking at lessons through a UDL lens. The more you can collaborate and have a different set of eyes look at something, the better it is in the long run. You have more perspective come in. Let's see, I'm just gonna summarize some of the things that are coming in. Someone is doing a presentation at ATI on Steam. Awesome, I'll see you there hopefully. Making a stronger connection between UDL lessons and workforce training. Excellent. Let's see, I'm gonna have to scroll up here a little bit. Learn some new UDL strategies, great. Absolutely Linda, it doesn't have to be a lot of work, if we are proactive about it, if we are intentional, and plan ahead.

- [Kendra] We have a couple of people talking about. We have a couple of people talking about deconstructing the lesson, and I think that's an important point as well. We'll be taking a look at how we take the lesson apart.

- [Luis] Absolutely, and I believe that's the next slide. So here are our goals. We have you reflect on yours, but here are the goals that Kendra and I developed for this session. What we're gonna do is, we're gonna present you with a traditional science lesson on biomes. We just picked a topic that we thought was interesting to the two of us. Be assured that no teachers were harmed or emotionally harmed in the making of this webinar. We did not select somebody's lesson plan. This is actually a lesson plan from PBS Learning Media. It was emailed to you earlier today, but if you didn't get that, at the bottom of the screen, there's the section where you're gonna see web links, and so one of those links, you're gonna see is, PBS Learning Media. That's the actual lesson plan that we're going to deconstruct. If you, while we're speaking here at the beginning, if you want to go ahead and follow that link, take a look at the lesson, I will give you some promptings for what we're gonna be doing. If we look at that lesson, we're gonna identify at least one barrier for each of the brain networks, and we're gonna look at how we can add an art component into the lesson, to make it into a STEAM lesson. Right now it's a STEM lesson, we're gonna make it into a STEAM lesson, and that's where the title of our session comes from. Gathering STEAM. As we look to make that lesson more inclusive, we're gonna look at how we can provide options for engagement, representation, and action, expression. You're probably familiar with those three words. They're the UDL principle. But we've broken out one of them, for action and expression, we're also gonna focus specifically on self-assessment, because we think that is so important. In fact, we're gonna dedicate some extra attention to it. All right, so here's another prompt, just to make sure we're all on the same page, and we're using the same language. In your own words, in the chat area, what is Universal Design for Learning, or we're gonna use UDL for short, throughout this webinar. Go ahead and just reflect on what it means to you and it doesn't have to be a long answer. Let's think about it with Tweet. If you were to Tweet out to somebody who's new to using UDL, how would you do that in 140 characters or less? Ah, Melissa, right off the bat! Creating unique ways to meet the needs of our diverse learners, great answer! Proactively planning to include all learners in the lesson. Absolutely, and that proactive piece is key. Love it, love it, Jackie, that's great! Set up strategies for opening avenues for more inclusive participation, absolutely! That gets at that equity piece. Being able to participate on an equal basis on the playing field, equal playing field. Let's see what else we have coming in. Building in strategies that allow each student to participate to the best of his or her ability. Definitely that idea of you have talent, how do we unlock those talents? How do we allow you to express those talents, and eliminate those barriers that get in the way of that? Lots of great answers, keep them coming.

- [Kendra] Yeah, Linda actually earlier mentioned too, that lots of teachers are already doing some of it, but they're not calling it UDL, so I like that point about drawing the intentionality. That we're actually doing it purposefully rather than perhaps, just by accident.

- [Luis] So true, so true, and that's something that I try to highlight a lot of times, is that you may be already doing some of these things that we sometimes call UDL, but it's putting the intention and the planning behind it, that takes it to the next level. All right, so let me give you one definition. This is the definition in the current legislation, the ESSA, and in that legislation, UDL is defined as a scientifically valid framework for guiding educational practice and that provides flexibility. I'm gonna highlight the keywords here, providing flexibility, is one, in the way that information's presented, in the way students respond, or demonstrate knowledge and skills, and in the way students are engaged. There's definitely that idea, some of you have already captured that in the chat already, of providing options, providing flexibility, and then the next key is reducing barriers, reducing barriers in instruction, providing appropriate accommodations, supports and challenges, and maintaining high achievement expectations for all students, including students with disabilities and students who are limited English proficient. That's a long definition, but what I've tried to do is highlight some of the key points there. Providing flexibility, reducing barriers, and then the last one to me is the most important. All students, right, so one of the misconceptions about UDL is that it's a special ed thing. How many of you, give me a smiley face in the chat area, how many of you have heard that before? Or just say yes, so Kendra, Jackie, right, so that's a common misconception and that's something where we need to do some work. We need to basically put it out there as much as possible that this is not for students, just for students with disability, notice that it says including students with disabilities, and students who are limited English proficient. Of course, we're gonna target their needs, but really this is for all students. We want to make sure that we lead off with that, and clarify in that area. All right, some of you, it sounds like from our chat area, some of you have some background in UDL. So you've probably seen this diagram before, and these are the three brain networks, and one of the goals, or actually the key goal of universal design for learning is to develop expert learners. At the bottom of the diagram, we see the definition basically of what an expert learner is. It's somebody who's purposeful, motivated, somebody who's resourceful and knowledgeable, and somebody who's strategic and goal directed, and so those are the three areas that we focus on, because those are three areas where neuroscience has found a great deal of variability among them. As you look at it, at three different parts of the brain, the effective network which is the WHY of learning in the center of the brain, the recognition network which is the WHAT of learning in the back of the brain, and the strategic network which is the HOW of learning, in the front. Each of these areas of the brain is tuned to perform a different task, or it's optimized for different tasks. For example, the back of the brain is basically tuned or optimized to recognize patterns in information that you receive from your senses. As you're reading a book, this is the network that recognizes the meaning of the words and let's you know what you already know. Basically, you recognize those things that you know and then those that you don't. The recognition network is at work there, whereas when you're solving a math problem, maybe you're involving the strategic network a little bit more, because you're thinking about the order of the sets you have to perform in order to get to that solution for that math problem, and if you've seen this kind of diagram before, you'll notice the affective network is first now, and that's because we have a lot of research now about how affect and emotion impacts on learning. If you're frustrated, if you have anxiety, if you're shy, all of these things, that you bring to the learning experience they can impact on your learning performance, and so that's basically a summary there of the three brain networks. Kendra is going to give you another way to think about this which is looking at the three principles to the UDL dialect, using them as a language.

- [Kendra] I created this diagram, a couple of years ago, and it was after watching a video by David Rose. It's called UDL Guideline Structure, and we've included that in our package. You don't have to go searching for it, and he's actually using the old guidelines but we often think about, when we look at UDL, of the vertical structure. So we have engagement, representation, action, and expression, but David talks about the horizontal structure, as well, of UDL. I really found that fascinating, and when I look at this diagram, when I created it, there's a couple things that were important for me. The main piece is, at the bottom, we have the foundation. I think about making an accessible classroom and providing or removing those barriers, as that bottom level of the horizontal plane, and then as we move up, we'll notice on the right hand side, we're moving from the extrinsic support we provide for learners and as we gradually release that responsibility and they become intrinsic learners. I like that movement towards this goal, and then the top piece of course, being that goal that Luis just mentioned, which is to become expert learners. When I'm designing, I think sometimes you can get stuck in the first and the second layer, and not really looking at how do we get these meta-cognitive learners who are thinking about their learning, understanding how they work. Being strategic in how they work, and that's a long process. Lots of us never reach that, but that idea of, when we're planning, we're aiming for that top goal, and sometimes when we provide technology, we think hey, we've done UDL, let's provide technology, but really that's that lower level, that foundational piece, and when I look at this as well, I start to look at that, and we'll talk more about the idea of constructivist pedogogy that we really are moving from a directed instruction where the teacher makes the determination, towards this more constructivist approach although we'll also talk that there's a balance there. For me this diagram really summed up nicely the vertical nature which provides the options to the learner, and then the horizontal which really directs the learning towards this expert learner. With that, sorry, yeah, go ahead.

- [Luis] If I could add one more thing before we move on from this diagram. From my observation, seeing a lot of UDL implementation, I think a lot of times we skip the bottom layer, and we go right to the middle, which is providing lots of options but sometimes if you don't pay attention to the accessibility piece, that's a foundational set, then the way that I see it, the analogies that I use, is that you're invited to a party, right, and then you show up to the party, and there's lots of really cool stuff happening inside the building, lots of activities have been planned for everybody, but when you get there, maybe you're using a wheelchair, and you notice that as you're going into the party, there's these big steps, and so you can't get into the building, right, so all those fun activities are off limits to you, and so that's the way I think that we need to think about this, is that we need to start first, by analyzing for those barriers, so that's that bottom set, and removing them, and then we can look at some of the other options here in the middle and of course the ultimate goal which is expert learners.

- [Kendra] I like that analogy, I like that analogy.

- [Luis] Well it's basically, if you don't make it accessible you may be providing lots of options, lots of choices, but it could be a false choice. We want to make sure that if we address that foundation of accessibility, then we're actually providing true choices for our learners. Go ahead Kendra, I'll let you take this one.

- [Kendra] This ties in nicely, it's where I like to start, when I'm looking at a lesson, and that is the UDL assumptions and beliefs, and also challenging our own assumptions and beliefs. There's a really nice video that we created with Mindy Johnson of CAST which again we provided you with that link. Around three minutes she talks about, or actually she talks throughout the whole thing, but around the three minute marks, she gets into the details of this. I like to look at these and they really are what Luis just talked about was the low lying fruit of removing barriers and considering variability, are really that foundational piece, and perhaps, I guess I'm an optimist, Luis, I always think people automatically add the technology and the access, but perhaps not. My question to you with these assumptions and beliefs are, and you can write in the chat box, are there any here that you haven't used or haven't considered, or find challenging, to how you might actually implement them or how they might impact your lesson planning. There's a couple that I feel really comfortable with but perhaps there's some that challenge you a little bit. We have some people typing I think.

- [Luis] Yes, I do too, so we'll give you just a little bit of time there. Takes a while sometimes to get your responses in, we'll give you some time. Ah, that is a big one that comes up. That idea of cheating. What are your thoughts on that Kendra?

- [Kendra] I've heard that a lot, and I've heard people talk about thinking it's like a cast on their arm that's going to repair, and when will they get rid of these tools, and when you say maybe never, you kind of get this blank look because the idea that it's gonna help you for awhile, fix you, and then you'll move on, definitely. Melissa talks about the separate goals, sorry.

- [Luis] I always liken it to eyeglasses, like if a student comes into your classroom with eyeglasses, you wouldn't remove their eyeglasses right? In some ways that's what some of these supports are. They're essential for you to be able to access the content. That sometimes is a way to address that issue of, people see it as a crutch and so on, when we provide accessibility, and also just talk about it as, it's leveling the playing field, making things fair.

- [Kendra] Right, and there's some great images of that, of the idea of the equity as opposed to equal, I think really sum it up nicely. We've got people talking about the separate goals, and Luis, you're going to talk about that in a moment which I think is a tricky one sometimes, because sometimes our curriculum combines the two. The idea Gail's talking about being overwhelmed with all the learner variability in their class and that can be at times for sure.

- [Luis] Yeah, Jessica, when you have students who have multiple disabilities, that can be a challenge for sure.

- [Kendra] Right, and Jessica talks about.

- [Luis] One of the things that I've said With regard to that, is that if we are proactive and we plan, we front load the planning which is what we do with UDL, we do a lot of the planning ahead of time, then maybe those students who have significant needs would then have some more time during the lesson to devote to them ideally. That doesn't always happen, but that's the hope anyway.

- [Kendra] Right, and Jessica also talks about, the end of unit testing, and sometimes the difficulty is, is that the testing itself doesn't separate the goals from the methods, and so the student struggles because not necessarily they don't know what they've learned, but they can't express it based on the method of the testing, and that's always a real challenge where we have standardized testing, things like that.

- [Luis] Lynn says overwhelming is a true feeling for this. Lynn, we're gonna try to make it so that it's not so overwhelming. That's our goal for the next hour, to give you some strategies, or give you a way of approaching lesson planning so it doesn't have to be so overwhelming.

- [Kendra] Luis, I think what's important, I was gonna say what's important there is if you, to not be overwhelmed is to sometimes just choose one of those assumptions, and deal with that. Perhaps starting with barriers, and working there, rather than trying to do them all. It's kind of like when we're gonna get healthy we can't do everything at once. If you pick one and really look at improving that it's a good way to focus, and not be as overwhelmed.

- [Luis] Yeah, and I always tell people, start small. Start to implement some of this in one lesson, one unit, because one of the things I want to emphasize is that we are expert learners as well, and the way that I look at the teacher, instead of using the term teacher, maybe we should use the lead learner, lead expert learner, and so if you're a lead learner, an expert learner yourself, you should be learning new things and improving over time, and that's actually something good to model for your students, and that's something that you want to vocalize to them, is just tell them, look we're gonna try something new, and you prepare them for that, and they can get to see that you yourself are improving and learning, and I think that's very important. I want to highlight that point. The lesson that we're gonna look at today is a STEAM lesson. For those of you that are not familiar with STEAM, it stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math. A STEAM lesson is interdisciplinary lesson that combines a number of these different disciplines. You may have a science lesson where the students are bringing in math, they're solving statistics problems, related to the topic of that lesson, or some math problems, or you may have all students bring in technology. They may be developing something with technology or engineering that addresses the topics that you're focusing on in the science lesson. Generally when we think about some of these, we think about STEM then if we add the Art, then that makes it STEAM. It's the Art and one or more of these other disciplines here. Yes, Andy says, STEAM lesson has two or more of these, yes. What these have in common to me, and I didn't put it in the slide, is the idea of design, and design thinking. That is in itself, that's a separate webinar, but I would encourage you to take a look at the methodology of design thinking and we can use that approach of design thinking in the Art, and Engineering, and Technology. It's what all these things have in common is that approach to solving problems through design thinking. Kendra, go ahead, you wanted to mention this book, which I think is a fabulous resource.

- [Kendra] I think it follows with what Luis just said and what Andy just asked, and that is the idea of making, as part of this STEAM process, and that when students are making there's always this combination of Science, Technology, Engineering, and that for me when I saw this I thought it really brought it together nicely. The idea that we really want our STEAM program to bring in a genuine love for investigation, asking questions, curiosity, and engaging about the world in which we live, and for me that really defined being an expert learner as well. We've given you links to this. It has a series of one and two page articles, and then lots and lots of ideas for maker and STEAM activities in the classroom. I thought it was nice. It was a free resource as a download. We wanted to include that for you, and for me it really talks about the focus on constructivism with our learners. We're actually moving away from just telling them how to make something. I can remember in the day, it would be the teacher would tell you what to make in science class or the experiment to do, to having the learners actually problem solve and create things that answer a question. That stood out for me as a resource.

- [Luis] Sorry, clicked too fast.

- [Kendra] Dueling arrows.

- [Luis] Just to add one more thing there, also I want you to expand the idea of making, because I think a lot of times when we think about making, we think about physical objects, and we think about a place. I was watching a webinar yesterday focusing on making and that's one of the points that they made that I loved is that it doesn't have to be a place, it doesn't have to be that you have to purchase additional hardware, additional devices, the act of making could be creating a documentary, it could be creating a piece of artwork. If we can expand that idea of making as Kendra said, it's really the constructivist pedogogy behind it that we want to focus on, constructionist too, rather than the end product, or the tools that we use.

- [Kendra] Right.

- [Luis] It's the idea of that open ended experience. All right, everybody, we don't want to make you hungry, but we're going to. I know it's close to dinner time for some of you so we're going to use food throughout this session. I hope you don't get too hungry. We're gonna begin, we're gonna approach this in two parts, and the first part is deconstructing a lesson, and don't worry, because if you order a hamburger, they don't bring you a tray with the individual pieces of hamburger and expect you to make it yourself. Maybe there's a place out there that does do that, but in general when you go to the store or McDonald's or wherever, and you order a hamburger, it's already made for you. We're gonna start here, by taking a lesson. I would say a pretty traditional lesson, from PBS Learning Media. Again, none of your lessons, you're not, nobody's gonna be emotionally harmed, and then what we're gonna do is look at the individual components from a UDL perspective, and by the way that's a little bit too much ketchup and too much mustard.

- [Kendra] That's right, and cheese!

- [Luis] Maybe a little bit too much cheese as well, but that's another concern. We, at least myself, I was inspired by this book, by Patti Ralabate who is, I believe she's with CAST right? It's a brand new book. It's How to Plan UDL Lessons. You're gonna see some of the things that she mentions in her book, but I wanted to give the book a shout out. I think it's something that you may want to look at over the course of this year if you want to continue to improve in this area. Inspired by some of the content in her book and then some of the work that Kendra has done, why don't you take this one Kendra, and go over this process.

- [Kendra] I will, so when I owned my professional development company, I wanted to take a look at something that had an iterative design to it. I created this very simple inquire, plan, act, and reflect, diagram, and why I applied it to this lesson planning in particular, is that it also, it's not just about planning your lesson, but also using your lesson planning and your lesson delivery as action research. So that the students are learning but you're also learning more about UDL as you move through the process. Very quickly, the inquire piece is really what is your starting point, and that could be your learners, and it can also be yourself, and you'll notice that I started with assumptions and beliefs. I like that, because again, we'll see that we come back to it in the reflect part. Again, not to be overwhelmed, you don't have to inquire and look at everything. The suggestions under here are just some of them, and I'm gonna talk a little bit as we go through about some of the inherent barriers that we have in our classrooms. Executive functioning support. You can choose one. The plan section, I divided into two aspects, and that is using the UDL guidelines, the first is the idea of the foundation, creating your UDL classroom and supporting learners right from the get-go. No matter what they're doing, there's these built in supports, and I think Luis would probably agree with me that that would include the technology that, the glasses for all of our learners, where possible, and then the instructional design component. If I'm teaching a STEM lesson, what aspects of that lesson can I support through UDL? What teaching and learning strategies can I incorporate? And then we look at the act component, and with the act component, I think there has to be what I like to call the idea of meta-teaching, and that's kind of a meta-cognitive approach to teaching where you're looking at how the learner is learning, how the lesson's going, but also how you're learning as well, and it ties nicely into after you've taught the lesson, into the reflection component. You'll notice when we reflect, we want to look at, what did you learn as well as what did your students learn, and when I again, deliberately put there, we look at your assumptions and beliefs. That brings you back around to inquire again, and that's really part of action research, is this ongoing small bites of inquiry and looking at how your students react, what happens in the classroom, changing your practice, reflecting on it, and then moving through it again. I think UDL is a perfect lens for that, because of course that goal is for the expert learner. We can always keep growing ourselves and our students as well. Luis did you have any comment there, No? I tried to anticipate you this time.

- [Luis] No, I just wanted to highlight the circular nature of this process.

- [Kendra] Yes.

- [Luis] That it's not linear. In some ways probably a better graphic here would be a spiral, because as you detail this then you wanna go back and you wanna reflect on what worked, what didn't work, and I liken it to a comedian, right? Basically when you go to a comedy club, you're seeing the final result. The final result has come about after years of practice, where you've tried some jokes, and sometimes they land, people laugh, it's a great joke and you keep it in your repertoire, and then some jokes bomb, and they don't quite work as well, and so you go back and you remove those from you repertoire, or you go back and you tweak them a little bit. We see the final product when you go to the comedy show, or an acting performance is the same thing. There's a lot of practice that goes into it. The other thing I want to highlight is if you can get somebody else to work with you that will also be very helpful to just have that other set of eyes work collaboratively, so that you together can examine each other's lessons and make them better. All right, so when we look at planning a lesson through a UDL lens, there's four areas that we need to focus on, and that's the goal, the materials, the method, and the assessment. Those are the four areas that we're gonna focus on for the next 20 minutes or so of this webinar, and I'm gonna start with a goal, and then I'm gonna turn it over to Kendra and she's gonna look at the assessment. We're gonna go back and forth, and throughout each of these segments we're gonna have some questions for you. As we look at the goals, that's really important with UDL, that we have some clear goals, and that we're beginning with the end in mind. These are some of the questions you may want to consider, as you're looking at your goals. What will learners know at the end of this lesson, and what will learners be able to do at the end of the lesson? And then the next thing is, what is essential for them to know and separating that from what is nice to know. As you said, one of you said in the chat area, we have limited time, we have limited resources, and sometimes it can be a little bit overwhelming. So I like this step, of taking those standards, taking the contents aside, and going through it and determining what's the essential understanding that I want my students to leave this lesson with? One of the books that I've read, this brand new book called UDL in the Cloud, by Katie Novak, it's a great book, and she talks about two years from now, what is it that, when you take this lesson, what is it that you're gonna remember? That is your essential understanding. That's where we want to focus a lot of our attention, and then build around that with what is nice to know. It's almost like you have a jar, and then you put some of the big rocks in first, and then you put in the sand around it. Hopefully that's a helpful way for you to think about that, when you look at the goals. We put a link to a great video in the resources, and again we'll share that with you at the end. We put it in at the beginning, but we're gonna bring it back at the end, so in case you missed it, and that video is from time and it talks about always begin with why? Have an idea why you're doing things, and one of the metaphors that I really like, or the analogies here, is from somebody called Michael Allen who is a guru in the field of instructional design, and in one of his books he talks about the idea of giving your learners lots of M&M's, and that doesn't mean that the dentists are gonna hate us by the way, it's not actual M&M's. What we mean by that, giving your learners lots of M&M's, is that you make it meaningful, you make it memorable, and most importantly, you make it matter, and so if you do that, these are going to be enduring understandings that they're gonna take with them. I want to prompt you, and ask you, what are some ways that you are providing your learners with M&M's right now? Not the actual M&M's, those are easy to do. But what are the ways that you're making them meaningful, memorable, and making it matter? Go ahead and type in the chat area for a minute or so. Don't be shy, you've been sharing some great stuff. Absolutely, attaching it to real life experiences. So that you're learning in context. Tell them it's something they can use today, Andy says. Absolutely, and that's true for us too, right? When you go to a conference, and you attend a session, or you watch a webinar like this one, you want to know what is something that I can use tomorrow, and you tend to pay more attention to that because it's more immediate to you. All right, so we talked about goals, and I already mentioned this book by Katie Novak, UDL Now, and I love the way that she divides goals into content versus method goals. The key difference, which I've highlighted here, is in how the goals and the means are coupled or uncoupled. The first example at the top there, are those content goals, where you ask students to describe, explain, analyze, summarize and so on, and you leave it open ended, how they do that, how they describe, how they explain, maybe they do it in drawings, maybe they do a podcast, maybe they do a video, so we're separating the means from the goal. We're giving you a lot of options in how you express your understanding. But as Kendra hinted at earlier, sometimes that's not possible. Maybe because of the curriculum that's been given to you, and so you may have goals where it explicitly says students have to create or write, and so on, and in those cases the goals and the means are coupled, and it's not always possible to separate the two. When that happens, it's important to provide scaffolds. For instance, I taught a writing intensive class at USF, in disability studies, and because it was part of the writing requirement each week my students, or every once in awhile, my students had to write an essay, as part of their assessment. I had no choice there. The means and the goal were coupled because of curriculum requirements. What I could do though, is provide some scaffolds. Some of those scaffolds were turning in a draft first so I could take a look at it, and provide some feedback, or turning in an outline first, so we could together look at where you have some gaps or where you need some additional help, and so on. There's lots of different scaffolds that you can provide so that even when you can't separate the methods and the content, that goal and the means, even when you can't do that, learners are still successful. Is there anything you want to add to that Kendra?

- [Kendra] No, but I was thinking, just for people to think back to the UDL assumptions and beliefs diagram, where we had the six icons, and that's there one of them was, that idea of separating out your goals and your means and being aware of it. I think sometimes you can't get away from it, but being aware of it and thinking about it as you're planning is so important as Luis mentioned.

- [Luis] All right, so let's take a look at applying this. There are some of the objectives from our original lesson. In the chat area, we want you to do the following, select one of these goals, then we want you to answer, is it a content or a method goal, and if it is a content goal, what are some of the creative ways that learners can show understanding, and if it is a method goal, where you can't separate the means from the goal, what are some scaffolds you can put in place? We'll give you a couple of minutes to do that and again, this is nearing the kind of thinking that you need to take when you're planning a lesson through the UDL lens. If we don't get to it, this is something, if you have an existing lesson that you're gonna teach. I know some of you are probably beginning the school year soon, you could apply this to your home lessons. Just go through those goals, and then first do that triage, is it a content or a method goal, and then think about when you can't separate the means, what are some of those scaffolds you can put in place? All right, so Linda has, absolutely, in order to identify, the terrestrial and aquatic biomes, there's lots of different ways you can do that. For those that are drawn to the arts, they can draw it, they can record themselves, there's lots of different ways, there we're not specifying how they're gonna do that. They can find, for describing examples of plant and animal in that space, they can find pictures, they can take pictures. Those pictures can be Creative Commons photos that are already available on the internet and they can write about them or remix them in a creative way by making them part of a video or a slideshow, or they can go out and take their own photos. Cool, cool, so I'm gonna keep going here, but keep those answers coming in. The next aspect of our goal, so once we look at separating the goals itself from the means of achieving it, is having goals that are SMART, and you're probably familiar with this acronym right? Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Result-Oriented, and Time-Bound. Just like you did a second ago, let's take a look at those goals again, select one of them, and then, is this goal SMART? And if it's not SMART, what's one way you can make it so that it's more SMART? As you write I'll just go over each of these things. You need to have some specific criteria for performance. How will you know that they've actually achieved that goal, and actually the next one as well, measurable, is it something that you can actually measure? Is it attainable? Is it realistic based on the age and developmental level of your learner? Is it Time-Bound? By what time are they going to be able to do this? Is it at the end of the lesson, those kinds of things. These are from the original lesson. We're still in the deconstructing phase. The hamburger is still in that tray. The mustard and the mayonnaise and all that stuff, separated. Identifying the biomes on the map is specific, it's attainable, result-oriented Karen says. Absolutely Linda, we could make something more specific by putting in some criteria. So what's the percentage of accuracy that you need to be able to do that? How many errors are allowed? That kind of thing. Excellent, lots of great answers coming in. I'm gonna move on to the next step. Here's one possible approach. I took one of the objectives here, which was describe the environmental factors and the plants and animals of each biome. Notice how we've made it time-bound, so a little bit more timely, at the end of the lesson. We're also making it more specific and measurable. You're gonna describe at least three environmental factors, and five plants and animals that are native to the biome you live in. It's a little bit more specific, more measurable, time-bound, and results-oriented. Any comments or questions about that? Any ways you could do it better? I'm open to it by the way, you won't hurt my feelings.

- [Kendra] Jessica asked, describe in what way?

- [Luis] Oh, that's the UDL part.

- [Kendra] Right.

- [Luis] Remember, this is the goal. We're leaving it open ended. We're saying describe, it's up to you how you do that. What's the way that works for you? If you are a great writer, go ahead and write it, if you love to draw, go ahead and draw. We're trying to make it open ended, and again, separate the means from the goal. Good pointing out. I'm going to continue here, and I'm going to turn it over to Kendra, so just to summarize, when we look at the goal, we want to whenever possible, separate the means for achieving the goal from the goal itself, and then when it's not possible, we want to put in scaffolds and supports. Then the next thing is we want to make those goals SMART. With that, I'm gonna turn it over to Kendra, who's going to do the next segment on assessments. Thanks for all your answers everybody.

- [Kendra] That's great, and I think that ties in really nicely with what Jessica was saying, was the assessment piece. How are you going to assess it, and I think that can be challenging when learners are doing it in different ways, and I think someone earlier mentioned it's perceived maybe easier. The student who wrote that essay, that's more difficult, or is more difficult than pointing. We really have to be able to separate it so that we can say it's really in that case about the content and not the means, and that is a really tough conversation I think to have with people, to understand the assessment focus. Leading with that, we want to look under assessment at what are you assessing? And that really is about separating the means from the goals, so that the learner is able to show you what they know. The other question we're gonna look at is why are we assessing? And in the past it tended to be that assessment was connected to evaluation and I think we're moving away from that, but there's still a lot of people who think when I assess someone it's for a mark or for a grade, and then we want to ask the question are the students assessing? Are they assessing each other and themselves? And let's think about that in the context as we move through of UDL. I like this diagram because it focuses on assessment and it moves away from summative and formative assessment and the book that I'll share with you in a moment I was reading about that it's not the actual assessment that is, not the summative or the formative piece, it's really that any piece of assessment can be used for as learning, of learning, and for learning. It's just on how you apply it. When I think about the inquire, plan, act, and reflect diagram, I can really see under assessment for learning diagram on the left how that really ties into the inquire piece. We might do some diagnostic assessment, we might do some formative assessment at the beginning and as we move through. It actually might help us with our planning, it might help us with our actual acting. The lesson that we're delivering. For me, the really important piece, is the middle, the assessment as learning, and if we want to think about that how it relates to universal design for learning, and the goal of being expert learners, is that we want the students to be doing formative assessment on peers and on themselves. Really having them think about their learning and becoming meta-cognitive. And of course, we always have the assessment of learning where there's the summative assessment, and I think here I debated whether the learner should also do some summative assessment of learning, and I think that's possible as they get older, as long as you have good criteria or a good rubric for them to actually assess themselves as well, in a formal way. Where I got this from, is a book called Growing Success, Assessment, Evaluation, and Reporting in Ontario Schools. And it's a big document, but around page 27 is where they do the assessment as, of, and for learning. And what I like about it is, it really looks at focusing your assessment on where the learner is going, where the learner is now, and where they need to get there. When we think again back to the horizontal diagram, of universal design, it's also supporting that extrinsic to the intrinsic where we're helping the learner gradually move through the process of taking this on themselves. It begins with the teacher identifying and clarifying learning goals, and then having the students, the peers, and the learner, actually doing the same thing over time. I think that's something to think about because we really want them to own their own learning. What we're going to do right now is, we want to take a look at the lesson. Now if you don't have the lesson in front of you, I'll let you know that the lesson is pretty traditional, that we gave you, fairly structured and organized. So the question is, is to look through the lesson, and see if you can find any assessment for learning, assessment as learning, and assessment of learning. If you can find those examples, types them into the chat box. If you can't, think about what sorts of assessment you think might be in there, given the goals that Luis mentioned earlier. If you take a look through you'll quickly see some of the different assessment pieces that are in here. Type those in if you can see them.

- [Luis] Absolutely, as you're doing your planning for the upcoming year, if you have a lesson in mind, that's fine, we would like to make this as relevant as possible to you, so go ahead and just mention if you haven't had a chance to look at the lesson we provided for your own lessons, where can you find examples of each of these?

- [Kendra] We stumped them.

- [Luis] I think the easiest one is the bottom one right? I think we're pretty good at that one.

- [Kendra] Exactly, right, exactly.

- [Luis] We do it all the time at education. That's the quiz, that's the end of the unit test, that's the, what are some other examples? I'm just warming you up a little here. What can you think of.

- [Kendra] Exactly.

- [Luis] Assessment for learning?

- [Kendra] So in this case the learners are going to work together. They do some brainstorming, they're going to be researching. What are some of the assessment for learning that you might do to see whether they're ready. Again, we might not be able to type. We've got some people typing, and then the assessment as learning. What might those students do as they're going through this that might have them thinking about their learning? How could you build that in so that they're actually considering what they're learning and how they're learning?

- [Luis] Okay, looks like we primed the pump this time. I see a few people typing in.

- [Kendra] Giving wait time. We're giving wait time right, we're gonna give you some time, and it is tricky, if you actually look at the lesson you'll find that there isn't a lot, it's mainly assessment of the learning in this particular lesson, and that's what we find we do focus on. As we move through we'll definitely be looking at assessment as learning, and assessment for learning as well. We do have in the carousel, brainstorm. They're looking to see if they agree with others, about the correct biome, and assessing peers in themselves. They are. Right, and Jessica talks about assessment for learning as a warm up activity. That's a great example, where they're really finding out, you're gonna find out what they know and where they are, but it's also that warm-up and getting them talking about the topic, great idea! Exactly, and we'll talk a little bit more about how we can actually build this in. In other words, if we're only doing assessment of learning, the learner's not going to become that expert learner that has these intrinsic skills because the growth is outside of them. If you wanna look at a growth mindset, we're doing all the work for them, when we're doing all of the assessing. Part of UDL, for me is, to build it in and give that, guide them through the process, but give them those skills in assessing themselves and assessing their peers, and also using the formative assessment to guide your planning as you go, so that it's not just the end of the lesson, but in fact, the learning is throughout. Here's an easier one, we'll do the materials now, Luis, because this one's fun.

- [Luis] Yeah, and this is right up my alley, because this is one of the areas that I specialize in is making learning materials more accessible, so I'm happy to take this one. We'll go through this one fairly quickly but we're right at 5:00, so I want to stop here. It's a great stopping point, and do a pulse check. I want to see in the chat area, you can let us know how this is going for you. You can give us a smiley face, or frowny face, hopefully mostly smiley faces, and then also any questions so far that you have that have come up. In fact, you know what I'm doing right now Kendra, what would we call this? Going back to the previous slide.

- [Kendra] Are you trying to test me here Luis? That's right. We're gonna do some assessment.

- [Luis] In some ways this assessment as or for learning because we're doing it in the middle of the lesson so that we can make some adjustments. If something's not working for you then we can go back and I can fill in some areas or Kendra can fill in some areas. So far it looks like I haven't got any frowny faces yet, mostly smiley faces, so I like that. You guys are making me happy.

- [Kendra] Jessica, yes.

- [Luis] In fact, you know what, I will do that right now. I'm gonna give you the direct link. I'll put it in the chat area, so those of you that missed it at the beginning I'm gonna go ahead and try to put it in here. It's gonna be a pretty long URL. Be aware of that. Let's see if that works. Yay, you just made my day. Can you say that again? Can you type it in like 10 times, at the beginning of a sentence? Because really, that's what we're going for. That just warmed my heart. Absolutely, I wanna highlight, this is for all learners. It's something that we need at general education conferences. It shouldn't be limited to the special education conferences. Nothing's wrong with that, don't get me wrong. I present at a lot of special education conferences but we need this at 50, we need this at, all of these general education conferences where it could benefit so many of our learners who sometimes fall through the cracks, or maybe don't yet know what they need, but if we are able to approach it in a more proactive way, then we can help them discover the support that they need. All right, it looks like we're doing well judging from the comments and the smiley faces, so we're going to continue here.

- [Kendra] I like Maurine's comment. Sorry, I was just gonna say, I like Maurine's comment about if we had a better take on UDL we would not hear so much about differentiation, interesting.

- [Luis] Yeah, you're so right, and I think a lot of times it's about marketing too. Certain words or terms gain some baggage over the years, where no matter how much we say that it's for all learners, people still have that misconception, and so sometimes I use the term inclusive learning or inclusive technology when I do technology that's oriented at more of a UDL approach, because I think it takes away some of that baggage on the terminology. Some excellent points. Materials, the materials, here's some of the questions we wanna ask. Can everybody perceive them? If we have a student whose vision is not 20/20 or they can't see certain colors or maybe their low light vision is not as good as it could be, are they able to see those videos? Are they able to see the materials? Can everyone interact with the materials? If somebody uses a specialized keyboard, because they can't use a mouse, or head pointer, or switch axis, are they able to interact with the materials that we selected for our lesson? Those two questions get us the basics of accessibility, but the most important question is can everyone learn from and with them? I think if you keep that question in the back of your mind it will help you evaluate not only the materials you create but the ones you choose from, because a lot of times we're choosing things that have already been created by a publisher, or provided by our school district, and so most of the time our process is not creating our own content or materials, it's actually just selecting them. Looking at the lesson, the original lesson, there are some good things that are in place. For instance, there's a number of videos for the different biomes, and for those videos you can turn on the closed caption. That's gonna benefit, not only somebody who is deaf or hard of hearing, but it's also gonna benefit somebody who's an English language learner. It's gonna benefit somebody who's new to this topic of the biome. Maybe seeing the terminology on the screen as well as hearing it, could be helpful, and then also there's some technical considerations. Maybe the speaker didn't work that day when you were trying to teach the lesson with these videos, or maybe they're trying to access it at home where it's loud, there's other siblings playing around the area, or they're not in the most quiet environment. In all those situations, those closed captions will be helpful, and then something that is not as common as captions but I'm starting to see it a lot is audio descriptions, and that's for somebody who can't see the video. When you turn on the audio description, it's actually going to describe the action of what's happening on the screen. Again, as we choose videos to use in our lesson, it may not be that we're making our own but a lot of times when we're choosing those videos we want to look for that indication that it's an accessible video, that it has closed captions. If you see that CC symbol, stands for closed caption, you're off to a good start. Likewise, we want to make sure that that video player is keyboard accessible as well. Definitely the closed captions are a good start. In the original lesson, this is an interactive that you can pull up, and let's see, maybe I'll give you second here, what are some issues you could see with this interactive? If you had a chance to open it? I see Linda's typing. No, Jessica, this is just a screenshot, but if you go to the link for the original lesson on PBS Learning Media, you should be able to open it there. Linda is correctly pointing out that maybe not enough contrast here, so it may be hard for some people to see. I'll give you a quick one, it's related to functionnality. The format that they chose for this interactive is Flash and that's something we need to be aware of because you can't open Flash on a mobile device. You can't open it on iOS devices. Right there, if that's the only device that students have access to, then this is not gonna work for you. I also noticed that you couldn't select the text in some cases, you couldn't use the text to speech features which these days we can find in most devices. Again, those are some of the things that you want to think about, is can everybody use this resource? Can everybody see it? Can everybody hear the content? Those are all considerations you wanna keep in mind. Here's another resource using the lesson, which is a map that students are supposed to refer to, and let's see yet, Jackie points out, there was limited interactivity, and for the most part, this was basically a pull or a push activity, all the content was being pushed at you. That was, when I think about interactivity I'll make a distinction here. When I used to do research on interactive whiteboards, one of the terms that I saw a lot was cognitive interactivity and interface interactivity. It's really important to keep those two in mind. Interface interactivity is, you're doing a lot of clicking, on the screen, using your mouse, using your keyboard, but there really isn't a lot of reflection going on. There isn't a lot of thinking, whereas cognitive interactivity you are engaged with the content. You're being asked probing questions. It's a higher level of thinking that's being addressed. To me this interactive, it was pretty low, in terms of the interactivity. All right with this map, I'll go through this real quick, so we can get to the final segment here, but one thing that could help with a display like this is if those labels were near the items that they describe because some people may be color blind, and they may not be able to tell those colors apart on the map itself. Although I would even question the usefulness of having them find this stuff on a map like this one. The final material I wanted to look at here is the one on the left which is one of the worksheets that the learners have provided, and just like before with the Flash content this is provided as a PDF, which you can open a PDF in some devices, but you may not have access to things like Texas Teach. What would recommend with something like this, I'm not a big fan of worksheets, but one thing you could do is put it in a different format that would be more accessible to more learners. An example of that would be perhaps Microsoft Word. It's much easier for learners to go in and edit it because that's one of the problems with PDF's is that it's not always easy to edit it. All you can do really is, it's a format for print, so you can print it out and you can write in with a pen or pencil but not everybody can do that so if we put it on the digital format like Microsoft Word or even Google Docs, then we make it possible for everybody to interact with the content. One of the points we want to leave you with in this section is, all of these things, even the digital materials, because sometimes we don't make them accessible, all of these things have some barriers in them, and so that's one of the reasons why we want to provide a variety of resources, so that again, you can find the one that works best for you, and if one is not accessible, maybe the other one is. Maybe that interactive had some issues as you pointed out with color, with contrast, but maybe the video is another way that you can access that information especially if it has closed caption and the like. Every resource has a barrier, that's why it's important to provide a range of content. I'm gonna bring it back to Kendra, I think. Actually before I turn it over to Kendra, I wanted to highlight the Inclusive Learning Network. Both Kendra and I have been involved with the Inclusive Learning Network for awhile, and in our work with that network we've created a number of resources, and as part of the resources list that you're getting we've linked to playlists that we created for this year's conference, this year's ISTE conference. There's videos in there that talk about how to create your own caption videos on YouTube. How to make sure that your social media campaigns are more accessible, and then I did one on Google Docs and how to make sure that those Google Docs are more accessible to people who use the screen reader or to people who can only use the keyboard to navigate. We've put that in the list of resources. We encourage you to check it out. I think it's gonna help you, again, provide more options, for how learners access the content and how they show their understanding. Now Kendra, it's your turn.

- [Kendra] All right, and we're, I'm looking at the time, so I'm gonna do this relatively quickly, and it really does tie into the materials. I think there's a complete connection here. When we look at the methods here that we're going to employ, and that is how will learners engage with the lesson? How is information presented to the learners? Again, Luis has shown you lots of different ways that you might create materials to present. How do learners express themselves and act strategically? And this is the part that we talked about earlier, what UDL supports are intrinsic to every lesson? How did I make that UDL by design? And how is gradual release employed? How am I helping the learners become better meta-cognitive learners, as opposed to just filling in that worksheet. I think is a really important question for us. I'm gonna go very quickly, and you can access this resource on your own and it's some questions that CAST gives to people that are lesson planning as a chart to lead you through, and it asks very similar questions to what we just talked about. What I want to emphasize here is that they are really looking at number one, four, and seven, are really the most important, and those are that higher part of our horizontal UDL design. We want to help all learners self-regulate. We look at, does the lesson provide options that help the learner self-regulate, help them sustain their effort and motivation, and engage and interest all learners? Then we want to look at, does the information provide options that help all learners reach higher levels of comprehension, understand the symbols, and perceive what they need. You can see how it goes down from being very high level to those lower level supports that are so important. Does the activity provide options that help all learners act strategically, express themselves fluently and physically respond. Those are just those high overarching questions that I think will help you as you're going through your lesson, and I think tying that into the resources you're using helps kind of bring it to life, and I think Maurine actually mentioned in her comment in the sidebar, where she says, "I'd rather have that Google Maps, and have them locate their biome, and add images and audio and video." You can see how she's really addressed not only the resource but the method piece as well, the instructional component starts to get built in there just by those ideas that she's sending out. Just given our time, what I did, was I analyzed the lesson that we sent you, and asked myself some questions. I asked questions about what's the student's why? In the lesson it's not very exciting in terms of how it starts. Perhaps it's part of a larger lesson but it just seems to be the teacher starts talking about biomes. I ask myself, and Luis just mentioned, the idea of are we just pushing content to students? At the very beginning the teacher's supposed to show them three videos. I ask myself, how might they pull that content. Do I really need to give them all of that information? Under representation, I'm gonna ask what barriers exist in the resources, and we just looked at that. We know that our instructional methods are going to need to change, or we're going to need to change the actual activity if we're giving students a piece of paper to fill in because we know there's lots of barriers there, and then we want the actions and expressions and I start to look at the choice. When I look at this lesson, I notice the students really do a fair amount of limited choice, not all the way through, and then the idea of the technology piece as well, in helping them express what they know. Again, there's a fair amount of limited technology. It tends to be push technology, and that is, most of the technology mentioned is video resources, websites, and online interactivities rather than the tools that the students might use. I'm gonna let us skip over so that we can get into the actual lesson, Luis, but you can take a look at those questions after this session and read them a little more closely.

- [Luis] Absolutely, and I've put those in a document in the list of resources that we put together. All right, let's start to look at how we can reconstruct this lesson. Doesn't it look much better when we have the hamburger all put together for us? Looks a little bit more juicy and tasty, more appealing. That's what we're gonna do next, in the few minutes that we have remaining. Of course, it's not just one hamburger right? Sometimes it's important to provide a buffet. I happen to like bacon. Everything taste better with bacon, at least that's how the saying goes. Some people may not like bacon, or maybe they can't eat certain kinds of cheese, so we want to provide a buffet of choices, and then there's always this sort of balance that we need to achieve between providing guidance and support on the one end of the spectrum, and options and choice on the other. With these two images, on the right under options and choice we see everything's just kind of put out on the table, and then it's up to you to basically pick the ingredients that you want to use in your hamburger or cheeseburger, and what's important here is, let's say that you had an allergy, you can choose not to put certain things into your burger, because maybe that doesn't work for you. That's one of the benefits of providing all these options and all this choice, is that we allow learners to find what works for them, and then on the other end, on the upper left here, we have guidance and support. We're providing a checklist for how to create this optimal hamburger. I'm making you all hungry. In terms of the goals, this is the revised goal for the lesson. At the end of this lesson learners will be able to and I'm not gonna read all of these, you can basically read them on your own as I talk about a few of them. Notice we've tried to make it a little bit more higher order. So we're looking at compare and contrast. At the same time, we've left it as open ended as possible, so that we're not specifying how you're gonna describe the environmental factors or how you're gonna explain the interrelationship. We're gonna leave that open ended, so that you can choose the means of doing that that work best for you. Here very quickly, in the lesson, basically they just had science standards that were being addressed. In the redesign I thought it was important to mention some of the art standards, and for me the key ones are the ones that I've highlighted here which really get at how do we make those connections between the social, cultural, and political experiences? And then also again, getting back to that idea of making learning more meaningful, and the last one there, how do you synthesize knowledge in your personal experience with art making in order to create meaningful works of art in design. I've linked to those in the resources so you'll have access to the latest national art standards. Here we're focusing on visual arts for grades 9-12, and of course, if this is a technology lesson, we need to refer to the new ISTE standards. Everybody clap, the new ISTE standards. You can clap in the chat area, but this is really important to be explicit about the ways in which we are bringing in technology so that it's not just technology for it's own sake. Just like with UDL, we are bringing technology in a very meaningful authentic way so I've highlighted a few of the ISTE standards here that we would address in the revised lesson. Kendra, you get the instructional design piece.

- [Kendra] In six minutes we'll break it down. The instructional design, really just quickly frames what we've been talking about and that is the idea of having the balance, options and choice, guidance and support, and building through things like essential questions assessment and culminating task, and I think that fits really nicely with what they're now saying in the ISTE standards about the real learning, the deep learning, that we want learners to engage in. Again, keeping a look at the time here, I'm gonna jump right into where Luis and I started with how would we build this out and what would we do differently? For us it really was about starting with the end in mind, addressing the why question, and so we really looked at a very different approach to this to engage and have some real world learning. We have things like, including in here, the teacher using Periscope or creating a short video. That's not always possible. You might have to take the kids out if you can. You might have to show a video but the idea of really having that problem close to home and realistic is how we built this out and then we also included a culminating task. For me that really starts to reflect problem based learning and the constructivist theories that we were talking about earlier, again where the learners are taking on something that's real and challenging for them depending on their age group. I also included in here, you can look at, after if you have more time, some other ideas, and I got this from the meaningful making document that we talked about earlier. You may say well I really can't do an action plan. It's too long, it's too much work, but there's so many other ways that you can bring learners in to have some hands on activities and that might be in this case, an interactive diorama or an eco-tourism experience. I highlighted the technology they included but as Luis mentioned it doesn't have to be things like Scratch and Makey Makey. It really can be some of the things that we already have in our classroom, for sure. All the way through, and I think for me this is kind of the last time I'm gonna harp on it, but it is really that idea of how will I build out the balance? How will I build balance into my instruction and how will I have the direct instruction, and maybe I don't have learners who are ready to take on their own learning. How will I gradually release that, and how do I support that in my instruction. We really want to look at how we're going to do that for our learners, and also how do we provide the guidance and the support and where do we do that? Luis, I'm looking at, we have four minutes. How would you like me to move forward here? I have a few more to go through but I don't want to cut us off, so we might have to jump.

- [Luis] Yeah, I'm gonna jump around. We can provide a copy of this presentation, as well to go with the video, but this is important so I thought we would touch on it really quickly. These are some ideas for assessment. Some of the things you can do. I'm gonna highlight the last one here, the learning journal. Originally we had this as a learning log, but I'm not big on the idea of logging, I like the idea of a journal better. I think it goes along better with that piece about assessment of, not of, for and as learning. Having the learners in our class keep a journal where they can not only reflect on what they've learned but also put down questions and concerns that they have and then that journal could be, doesn't have to be a physical journal, could be in digital format in Google Drive. The teacher can also go in and check in on it and see what kinds of concerns are coming up repeatedly in the class that need to be addressed. Rubrics of course are a great way for putting in that assessment, as and for learning. So that learners are assessing themselves as well as they go through the process, and then bringing in a great deal of reflection. Just some ideas here for the assessment piece and again we'll share this document as a PDF.

- [Kendra] I think the one thing for me there, is just assessing before you start, how much experience your learners have assessing themselves, so they may need a lot of modeling from you, and guidance in that, rather than, because you may not get what you want unless you provide the prompts and the modeling for them.

- [Luis] Right, here's the introductory task that we came up with. Basically they're going to work in groups, getting at that collaboration piece, but also I think it's important for some learners who don't work as well in a group maybe providing options that they can work individually as well. What they're gonna do is a mixed media presentation and that will include things like mural, posters, so on, and they can also bring a digital component into it, and they can do that through resources that they research online and they can connect the two, the traditional media and the digital media, using things like QR codes, and AR. Not every learner is gonna know how to do that. You may need to spend some time at the beginning of the year, if you plan to use that strategy quite a bit, teaching what the QR code is and how to scan it and so on. But as we do that activity, basically at the end, they're going to do similar to the carousel levels in the original lesson, but here we're calling it a gallery wall. They're gonna walk around, they're gonna check, or look at the displays that each group has created and then they're gonna reflect on it and provide some feedback. One of the ways you can do that is you can have learners indicate what they like and what they wonder. That's one way that they can provide feedback to their classmates in a way that is not as threatening. To get some ideas, there's a great website tryengineering.com These are some ideas that you, I don't want to prescribe these but these are just some places where if the learner is interested in doing this kind of thing I live in Florida, so the oil spill from BP oil well in the Gulf is still fresh in our mind, and then of course lately Zika. We just had our first case here. You can pose these challenges to the learners and then have them come up with possible solutions or at least start prototyping them, and in the process of prototyping those solutions that's a lot of great learning that could take place, and then we're almost done here, but we also thought that it was important to have a culminating task, and this is where we make it actionable, and that's the difference to me between problem-based learning, project based learning, and what I like to call challenge based learning, and there's actually a website for that and I'll include that in the resources, called challengebasedlearning.org but they're doing something with the knowledge they gain through the lesson, and they could for instance, create a PSA, that's shared with the community. They could create a social media campaign, where they create images, and they share them online on different platforms like Twitter and so on. They can create some posters that you could post around the school, and the community, to raise awareness about the issue they've learned about during the lesson. By doing this culminating task, we're bringing in these higher order skills like decision making, problem solving, and so on, but also picking up some important skills along the way. Maybe that they need to do a survey to understand what the issue really is in the community and maybe they need to learn some different types of technology in order to create that PSA and that social media campaign. And those things are important as well, those sort of supplementary skills they'll pick up. Your task, we wanted to have a culminating task for you as well. Kendra, why don't you go ahead and describe this? This is the next to last slide.

- [Kendra] And you don't have to do it now. We don't expect you to. This is a great video from Edutopia. We won't make you do that. It's a great video from Edutopia and not meaning any disrespect to the educator here who does a fabulous job of really bringing science and STEAM to life, but when you watch the video take a look at some of the things he does, some of the UDL principles he includes, but think about how he might improve engagement, representation, and action, and expression. If you look, sometimes watching it twice is a really good idea, because you'll see some of the students in behind the ones that are very enthusiastic but I think his ideas are brilliant, and then you wanna ask yourself is he intentional in his application of UDL? And how he might be more intentional there? And I also ask the question, how could technology support him? It really doesn't have some of the technology supports that I might include in that classroom and again you can use the UDL guideline document as a reference to help you as well as all those questions that we talked about before that lead you through the UDL guidelines.

- [Luis] All right, so here's the last slide, but before I talk about it, we want to make sure that you give us some feedback. There is a SurveyMonkey. Ana-Maria just put the link to it in the chat area, so please make sure you complete that, and that way you'll also get a link to print your certificate of participation. I'm going to also put the link for the handout one more time so in case you missed it. This is the Participate Learning collection of resources. There we've included a number of different lessons for you to take a look at, to analyze to get some inspiration, and then some of the slides were a little more actionable so we had I created those as separate Google Docs that you can go in and make your own copies if you want to use them yourself, to evaluate a lesson. That's a takeaway for you, those three things, the instructional planning guide, the assessment overview, and the foundational support chart, and there's the number of the slide where they're found, but now it's a separate document. You can go in and take a look at those and use them yourself. We're a little bit over time but I want to make sure we have a little bit of an opportunity here for you to ask some questions or maybe some parting thoughts so what's one takeaway from today's session that you have? Let's end with that, one takeaway, one idea, that you plan to use tomorrow or next week when you go to plan your lesson, and then we'll stick around for a few minutes and see what you have. While you're typing I want to thank you all so much. If you're here with us live, but also if you're watching the recording. We really enjoyed doing this webinar for you and I think Kendra will agree with me you've been a great audience. We went over time a little bit but that's because we wanted you to interact rather than just throwing slides at you, so that took a little bit more time than we planned but I think hopefully it was worth it for you.

- [Kendra] I agree, it was a great group of people, everybody posting really helps make it more interactive which is always difficult with a webinar, and Luis, as always, I learn an incredible amount from you, listening to you, so I get two birds one stone, when I work with you, I get to present and I get to learn at the same time.

- [Luis] Absolutely, I see the great comments coming in. Lots of great takeaways, we love to see those. I'm not sure, John, which two questions, but for me it always starts with those M&M's. How am I gonna make it meaningful? How am I gonna make it memorable? How am I gonna make sure that it matters? Love to see the idea of the lead learner. Hopefully that's a nice takeaway for you and it changes the way that you approach the school year as it starts, that you are learning yourself. You are an expert learner, and modeling that for your students is important. All right, well I think that's all the time we have. Again the recording will be available soon, and we'll also make sure that this presentation is available to you as a PowerPoint. Thanks so much everybody, and have a great beginning to your school year.