AT & Accommodations in Post-Secondary Education: Supporting Successful Transition

Featuring AT Specialists Diana Petschauer and Alyssa Marinaccio, this webinar provides parents and professionals with resources and strategies to help ensure that the transition from high school to college is a successful one! (Get the PowerPoint slides in the Download Here section).
 

 

 

Transcript: 

- [Voiceover] Good afternoon, everyone, and welcome. We'd like to welcome you to the CTD webinar, AT and Accommodations in Post-Secondary Education: Supporting Successful Transition. Your presenters for this afternoon are Diana Petschauer and Alyssa Marinaccio. And with that, I will turn the floor over to them. Thank you.

- [Voiceover] Thanks so much, Nolan. As mentioned, I am Diana Petschauer and we'll get started with introductions in just a minute. Want to let the audience know that at the end of the webinar we are asking you to fill out the brief survey, and when you fill out your survey you will be provided with a link to this evening's certificate of participation. So as mentioned, I am Diana Petshauer. I am a RESNA certified assistive technology professional, founder of the company AT for Education. It's a New England-based company but we provide services nationally. And I have 11 consultants that are experts in various aspects of assistive technology and disability services. We do travel throughout New England and nationally to provide the assistive technology, assessments, evaluations, training, and we do live webinars and professional development workshops such as this evening. I am previously the AT specialist at the University of New Hampshire disability services for students. Paul, thanks for that, I was wondering where that was. And somebody just bumped me off of the webinar by clicking on those and brought me to the survey. So I did lose visual, so I'm gonna turn it over to Alyssa Marinaccio to introduce herself while I sign back in. Just to let the moderators know, at CTD when you clicked on that survey while you were changing the slides, it bumped me off. So I don't see the screen. So I'll let Alyssa introduce herself and I'll get back on.

- All right, thank you, Diana. Hi, my name's Alyssa Marinaccio. I am currently the assistive technology coordinator at the University of Connecticut. Just a little about myself, I got started in this field as I was a student registered with the disability services at my undergrad with an LD and ADHD. And never having been exposed to assistive technology during my undergrad, that was something that I wanted to do. As I went through my career and got more interested in the AT field, I wanted to provide services for students so they would be exposed coming in to college and be able to use those resources. So after that I was the AT coordinator at Keene State College in New Hampshire. And that's where I got started in the field. I'm also a consultant for our AT for Ed, the assistive technology for education company, providing trainings and consulting with Diana. And it looks like Diana's back in.

- [Voiceover] I am, yeah, thanks, Alyssa. So as I was saying previous to my business I was the AT specialist at the University of New Hampshire helping students, taking them in, reviewing documentation, providing accomodations as well as training for assistive technology that they could use on campus. So that's where I met Alyssa, when I worked at UNH and when Alyssa worked at Keene. And so together we've been presenting and providing assistive technology services since, including through AT for Education. So this evening we're going to be providing a lot of information through this slideshow which is available to you. You'll have access, you should have access to this slideshow presentation as well as the handout. And we also did provide--

- [Voiceover] Do you have the other remote control?

- [Voiceover] We also did provide it as a link here, and as Jackie mentioned in the chat, it's available at the CTD library and will be available at CTDinstitute.org where you registered for this webinar. You'll be able to access the presentation as well as the handout and a video of the webinar is always posted a few days after we present. So if you miss anything or want to go back to anything that we show this evening, feel free to go ahead and go back to CTDinstitute.org and you'll be able to access the presentation as well as the video and handout. Up on the screen right now you'll notice in said part of the presentation there's also a link to this presentation as a Google Slide presentation. So I know many of you are using Google, Google Slides, and some of the tools that we're going to show you this evening work with Google Slides and Google Docs and things of that nature. So if you want this in that format you will have that. And we also have the accessible formats for anyone who might be using screen readers, so those are provided as well. So we're going to get started this evening with laws and accommodation. So when considering the laws and accommodations that are provided between students who are attending K through 12 schools versus students that are registered in higher ed, as well as in the workplace. So tonight we're talking about K12 versus college. And so for your students, currently if you students or children, depending on who's joining us this evening, if you're professionals working with students or if you're a parent joining us, and you have a student in the K through 12 system, those students are covered with an IEP typically, individualized education plan or 504 plan, and they're covered under the law IDEA. IEP teams, too, are responsible for considering assistive technology needs for all of their children with disabilities and for finding and seeking out those students with disabilities and providing them with the accommodations, including assistive technology. So embedded in this slideshow presentation are many links that you can use after this evening. If you'd like to go back, there's some links about the laws specifically that you can click on these links to get to, if you'd like to know more about what the difference is. There's also a link there you can see to the handout that we are providing this evening, which is really excellent in regards to pointing out the specific differences between K through 12 and higher ed. When the students get to college, they are covered under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and ADA, Americans with Disabilities Act title two. And so the students don't have an IEP in college. The IEP ends when they graduate high school. It will be part of documentation which they submit for documenting their disability when they get started with disability services in college. And we'll speak more to that when we get to that part of the presentation. But the IEP is not the only documentation that they're going to provide to the college. But it's nice to see a history of the accommodations, including assistive technology, if it's in there. So the students will... I hear it echo, I'm not sure, somebody else's speakers are on right now. I think that was taken care of, thank you. So again, as I mentioned, the students will not have a 504 plan in college or an IEP, but they are covered under the law and they will receive accommodations, and we'll talk more about what those accommodations and letters of accommodations look like as we get through the presentation.

- [Voiceover] All right, so where and when to start? When you're looking at schools, it's important to check out the disability services websites and visit the office. All students are accepted on the same criteria as any other student without a disability, so you need to be accepted to the institution first before registering with the disability service office. We encourage students to meet with the ODS or DSS staff and counselors prior to and ask about the process and what's available on campus. And if you can do that earlier rather than later on, usually that process gets started around June prior to the fall semester entering in of the first year. So getting in there early and asking what will be available to you in college.

- [Voiceover] Great, and as Alyssa mentioned, what's really important for students to remember is you do need to be accepted to that institution first. So any college that you're applying to, it's not necessary for you to disclose your disability on those initial registration and admission forms. Some students like to do so, they like to point out that they do have a disability, and that's absolutely okay, especially if you're explaining test scores or anything of that nature. But just so that you're aware, any student with a disability is accepted to a college first based on the same criteria as all other students that are accepted to that college. And if they have a disability, they can then register with disability services after they have been accepted. But always great to check out the services while you're looking at colleges. Just like you're typically looking at everything else that you want from a college, you wanna be looking at the disability services and technologies and what they offer prior to making your decision as to which college you're going to choose.

- [Voiceover] So as far as documentation needed, you absolutely want to be prepared before you're going in to that intake meeting. The colleges will typically list on their website what's required or what they're going to need from you. And if it's not listed on their disability services website, you can always call a counselor and ask them what specific documentation you're going to need. It is similar at college campuses, but some, of course, have their own criteria and specifics, so that's why it's always great to talk to someone at disability services at the particular college that you're interested in. Overall, most colleges will want a self-report. This is really important, self advocacy, we're gonna talk a lot about self advocacy as we get through this presentation. Really important for the student to know their disability and know their strengths. And we'll continue to talk about that because there is no self advocacy curriculum. It is a lot of role modeling, role play, the counselors will be speaking to the students as adults and not to parents and not to counselors, unless, of course, with exception to those who might have a communication disability and need that support. But other than that, you want the student, and if you're a student, to be a great self advocate and to be able to give a self-report of what you're requesting for accommodations and why you need them. You will be requested to provide doctor notes and diagnosis of your disability, any assessments or evaluations that have been done. Some colleges will want those recently done within the last three years, depending on your disability. For disabilities such as blindness, if you've been blind your entire life, then the documentation, of course, may not reflect within the last three years unless it's an updated vision report. So it's pretty specific in regards to what the disability is and the type of evaluations, assessments that you will be submitting. And again, as mentioned, if you do have an IEP or 504 plan as a student, it is nice to submit with the other docuomentation so that the counselors can see a history of accommodations that supported the student during high school. And we'll go over various types of accommodations that you can request in college. So again, remember, each college and institution is different. Check the website, call and meet with the counselors, they are always happy to meet with you when you're visiting campuses. Self advocacy and awareness, as I mentioned, is really, really important. It's really important for students to know their disability. It is unfortunate if students are not attending those IEP or 504 meetings with their parents towards the end of their high school career, because it is really important for them to know their rights, to know their disability, know their strengths, what they're really good at, how they prefer to learn, what are their learning styles and preferences, and then also what's challenging for them and what's difficult. It's really great for family members or counselors or disability service providers and teachers to role play conversations that might happen with the counselor. The counselors are certainly going to be asking the student, "What accommodations do you need and why do you need them? "Why are these things that you're asking for?" And again, we'll mention the accommodations that are typically offered in college and what students can ask for. And really important for them to know why. For example, if they need text-to-speech for websites read aloud or books read aloud because of a learning disability or because of low vision, et cetera, they want to be able to explain that they need that accommodation, and why they need it, and why they're going to be successful with that accommodation. Parents, it's really important for you to know you've been the advocate along the way. Many parents, certainly very involved with their student as far as IEP meetings or 504's, and a lot of times the parents are speaking for that child for much of their life, and really advocating for their accommodations. And when that student becomes an adult at 18, the student does have the right to not have the college individuals and professionals communicate with the family members, including the parents. They have that right as an adult. And they can sign something that says that you're able to speak with parents as well, but during those meetings it's going to be the counselor speaking to the student, it's going to be the counselor expecting the student to know their disability, to know what they're asking for and why they need it. So parents really need to be prepared for that, especially if they've been advocating the whole way. You really wanna prepare your child to be their own self advocate and be aware of their needs and their strengths and their challenges and what their disability is.

- [Voiceover] So pre-college exposure to AT. When it comes to assitive technology, as Diana said, you're going to want to advocate not only what your disability is, but what you need in order to be successful in college. So students need to know what to ask for and what options are available. Oftentimes the human resources in the K through 12 system are replaced by assistive technology resources in college. So if a student's used to having a human reader read their exams for them, when they come to college, a lot of the time they'll be expected to use text-to-speech technology. And the same thing for a human scribe, if they are used to having somebody take their notes or scribe for their exams, we'll have them try speech-to-text technology or different technology-based note taking services. So that's, of course, not for everybody, but a majority, we encourage them to use the assistive technology to be more independent and provide them with access. And then it's up to them to use that in order to succeed. So getting this exposure prior to college is important so that they can come in and hit the ground running. As everyone knows, going in to college is a big experience and they have a lot to learn, so the less that we can add to stressing them out and learning new things, the better. So that'll make their transition smoother if we can expose them to the types of technologies that they may be using at the college level.

- [Voiceover] And in regards to funding, we'll be talking about various options for free and low cost assistive technology this evening and providing demonstrations for various types of assistive technologies that you can expose your student to, or that students can start to use now on their own to get used to assistive technology and become familiar with types of technologies that are out there to support them. So you're gonna have some options after this evening, free and low cost options to check out with your students or with your child, depending on who's attending this evening. And really great, as Alyssa mentioned, to expose them to it so that they can become familiar and know what's available at college and be able to take off with that as soon as the semester starts. As far as funding vocational rehabilitation, there is a vocational rehabilitation office, several of them, in each state, typically, on a regional basis. Really good at, towards the end of the senior year, to make sure that the counselor is involved. For some states there may be a long waiting list for vocational rehabilitation counselors, voc rehab for short. So even once the student becomes a junior, looking into your resources in your state and ask your vocational rehabilitation office when that student should be in touch for a counselor, specifically the educators for disability counselors or sometimes advisers and other types of guidance counselors at schools that can get vocational rehabilitation involved. And those counselors can help the student in regards to acquiring funding for an assistive technology evaluation. Many of our consultants for AT for Ed go out to various schools and provide the assitive technology evaluations to make recommendations for assistive technology, and that includes for the transition to college or the workplace. And I think that someone had their speakers on so that echoed a little there. So a lot of times they can provide funding for the evaluation as well as the technology that's recommended for that student for that transition. So that can be a great relief to families, so it's really great to make sure that you do reach out to your vocational rehabilitation offices and counselors and get them involved before that student graduates. As far as the accommodation process, it is different at each college institution, which is why we always encourage you to check out those websites, visit the colleges, or call them, you can even have a phone meeting if you can't get to the campus. The accommodation process, however, at every institution is absolutely confidential. No one knows the disability of that student unless the student chooses to disclose. Even when they receive accommodations, the accommodation letter does not have to disclose what the disability is, just simply what the accommodations are that that student has access to. The student will meet with the counselors after they have been accepted to the institution. They will register with disability services and provide all of the documentation that we spoke about, and they will get an appointment set with the counselors to meet with those counselors at disability services, and they'll get their letters of accommodation. Sometimes it's through email, sometimes it's in person, and those accommodation letters are going to have the details of what accommodations those students have access to while they are attending their college classes or while they are on campus. And we're gonna talk more specifically about what those accommodations could be. The accommodation letters then are taken from the students to the professors or instructors. And they make a plan with that professor or instructor. Sometimes it's going to be in person, either during office hours or after class. Sometimes it's going to be through email or a phone call. But the professors and instructors will need to have a copy of those letters, the accommodation letters, and the student needs to speak with them about how things are going to be provided, whether they're going to stay after class in a specific room for extended time, for example, or whether they're going to be going to a specific proctoring lab on campus that's available for extended time for testing and things of that nature. But all of it can be discussed prior to the class starting and during summer hours, as well. So a lot of those things can be taken care of before the student starts. Other times it happens within the first couple weeks of class. You meet the instructor, you email them, you call them, you let them know that you need to meet with them to talk about the accommodations that you have. So some accommodations that are available in college. There are a lot of different types of accommodations, but generally offered, extended times for tests and quizzes. Usually there's not extended time for assignments because you get your syllabus at the beginning of the semester and have all those dates of exams, I'm sorry, of your assignments, and when things are due. So they expect you to use the time management and plan out your semester accordingly. For testing, a lot of times is offered a quiet or separate space for testing, depending on the school. Again, these are things to look into. Some have separate rooms, some have rooms with cubicles, so that just gives that reduced distraction environment for students, especially also if they're using any assistive technology to read aloud to them, many times they'll have a room to do that with a computer. Another common accommodation is alternative text and accessible textbooks, having them in audio, digital, braille and large print. So students that need to be able to access that text using assistive technology or for any other reason need it accessible electronically can have that. And we're gonna talk a little bit more about the sources to get those alternative texts. Also note taking services, so a lot of times there are peer note takers, where students in the class are the ones actually taking notes, and it's a confidential, well, depending on the school, a confidential process where the note taker doesn't know who they're taking notes for and vis versa. But then, again, like I said, we're trying to implement more technology-based note taking services, so there's the Livescribe pen, iPad apps, audio recording apps, and we're gonna show and talk about a few of those when we get to the demos. Another accommodation is reduced course load, so if a student can't take a full course load for whatever reason, due to medical conditions, they can take less credits or courses but still be considered a full time student so it doesn't affect their financial aid or housing or any of the services that are offered to a full time student. There's also transportation and navigation support, so accessible vans that are on campus and services that can pick up students and have those routes figured out, and have them pick them up for their classes.

- [Voiceover] And of course, as part of assistive, as part of accommodations available in college, there's also assistive technology options. Assistive technology is available such as literacy software, so many times the students will get to campus and there is already literacy software available, some of which we'll be demonstrating this evening. Other times they may be going in with their own laptop or device and bringing literacy software with them. Smart pens, as Alyssa mentioned, and other types of apps on tablets and iPads for note taking, some of which we're going to demonstrate this evening as well. Magnification in several different ways, whether it's on a tablet through an app, magnification software, screen readers, such as JAWS, or Window-Eyes for individuals who are completely blind and need access to screen readers. Voice recognition, speech input, dictation, voice recognition is called many different things now. There's certainly free options for this as well as the software that many people are familiar with, Dragon, for those who need to completely control everything about their computer using their voice, and sometimes controlling things in their environment using voice recognition. And so there are various options for assitive technologies that you could ask for, or go to college expecting to use and ask for the accommodation of using assistive technology throughout the courses and throughout your time on campus. So we are going to get into the demonstration. And what we're going to do is demonstrate some of the options that you have for free and low cost options as well as paid options and compare some of those. Alyssa's going to start first with some demonstrations. She's going to begin by sharing her screen, so you're going to no longer see the slideshow and you're going to see Alyssa's laptop or desktop in just a moment. And she's going to begin with the demonstrations.

- [Voiceover] All right, so, can...

- [Voiceover] Yep, we can see you here.

- [Voiceover] You can see it? Okay. All right, so first I just wanna start, before going in to the demos, that there are a lot of resources available to get started with assistive technology. I know a lot of times if in high school, when we talk to them about the technology and what's available, a lot of schools say, "We don't have the funding," or, "I'm not sure where to get started." So this here is a resource that we put the link in the PowerPoint. This is actually a website that I built when I first got into the field, and what it is is a collection of free and low cost assistive technology resources broken down into functional limitations. So on the left there's the categories of reading, writing, vision, hearing, and once you click on it, say I have difficulty with reading, some low cost and free options come up. And there's links to learn more about it as well as what it's compatible with, because we found a lot of the time, yes, there's a lot of great accessibility feaatures in the iPad, but not everybody has an iPad. So we wanna try to put different types of resources on there that, depending on what kind of platform you have, you can find something that'll work for you. So this is just a resource to go back to, as well as our AT for Ed website lists different examples. And so I'm going to, you'll see that we're gonna show a lot of these today, some of the free and low cost. And so we're actually gonna start, first I'm gonna talk about some of the literacy support programs, and you'll see here there's Natural Reader, and I think there's some of the paid options that you'll see in college are Read&Write and Kurzweil are two of the popular ones that, again, if you look at the college prior to going you'll see what they have and what they offer. So I know, for instance, at Keene State, UNH, and U Conn, all the schools we've worked at, all have site licenses of Read&Write, which I'm gonna show you, and students can get it on their computer. But before going into the text-to-speech, I just wanna mention, we talked about before about alternate text being a accommodation for students. And so if you're a service provider and wanna know more about providing those texts, there a lot of popular service providers that we go to. Access Text Network, which is the website I have pulled up now, is one of them, along with Bookshare and Learning Ally. But we actually use this site here is Access Text Network offers an accessible textbook finder. So it's nice, I can just go in and type in the ISBN. I have one pulled up here. And press Search. And what it will do is tell me what service has it. So you can see, Access Text Network has it, as well as Bookshare, and then some other resources, and then no results from Learning Ally and AMAC and those resources. So this is a good way to cut down the research. And then once you go in you could make the request through Access Text and Bookshare, so you can be a free member of these two as a service provider. So if you're looking for more information on how to actually provide those textbooks to your students, we can follow up with more information. But this is a great place to start here. So I'm first going to go into Natural Reader, which is a free text-to-speech program for the Mac and Windows. And I've pulled it up here. And you can see, so like I said, we like to give free options as well so if students need a place to start or just get familiar with text-to-speech, or don't have the funding, Natural Reader is a great option that a lot of students prefer to use. So you can see I have, I pulled in a PDF, and I can have Word documents, and you could also pull in webpages. So I'm first gonna open one of my Word documents here. And now it's having... A little trouble today. So let's cross our fingers that everything goes smoothly here. You can see that I can increase the size of the font as well as change the font and change the theme. So if I need some of the high contrast, I can do that, and change the speed of the voice and the voice as well. So this is the free version of it. You can upgrade to get more features as in a lot of text-to-speech programs. But let's see here, I'm gonna highlight and... All right, I'm gonna highlight and press Play.

- [Voiceover] It emphasizes the need--

- [Voiceover] Sorry, I forgot to unmute myself there, let me start again.

- [Voiceover] To support these students throughout their transition. Assistive technology is a viable and comon solution to meet the needs of students with LD at the post-secondary level.

- [Voiceover] All right, it picked it up in the middle there. So you can see that it will read it aloud for you, and when we go in to some of the other, to the other low cost and paid options, you'll see that there's a little bit more you can do. But again, this is a just good place to start if you've never heard of text-to-speech or wanna try it out for free. It's a no-risk option. So I'm gonna go back to Chrome here and we're gonna show Read&Write.

- [Voiceover] Which is

- [Voiceover] And so as Alyssa is pulling, go ahead.

- [Voiceover] Nope, go ahead.

- [Voiceover] As Alyssa is pulling up the Read&Write Chrome extension, just wanted to explain to the participants that currently Alyssa is in the Chrome browser. I'm using the Chrome browser this evening as well. Some of you may be using another type of browser to get onto the internet, like Firefox or Safari or Internet Explorer. We're using Chrome this evening, and what's different about Chrome is that there's this Chrome webstore which Alyssa is currently, has projected for you to see on her screen. So the Chrome web store has hundreds and thousands of educational apps and extensions that are free or low cost. 98% of them I would say are free. Others available for free for a limited time, so you can try them first, and then they're a subscription, but so many options for text-to-speech, voice recognition, mind mapping and brain storming, scheduling and reminders, a lot of things for executive function skills. So it's really important and really great resource for educators, parents, and students to check out this Chrome web store. We're gonna show you a few of those apps and extensions this evening, but know that it's here and know that you can get back to this to use after tonight's presentation.

- [Voiceover] Yes, and so when you install those applications they'll show up on the top right next to your URL bar. So I have various ones installed, and I'm going to be using the Read&Write right now, which is the purple bubble piece. So this one is the Read&Write application for Chrome. And as I mentioned before, many colleges have the actual software that students can install on their laptops and take with them, which is nice because they don't have to go to a lab to use the technology and can use it wherever they are with their laptop, which is nice. And many people have the Chrome option as well. So here I'm gonna show you that when I press on the bubble piece the bar drops down and I have this website open. So if I wanted to read I can press this bubble with the mouse, and that will allow me to hover speech. So wherever I hover...

- [Voiceover] Aristotle is a towering figure in Ancient Greek philosophy, making contributions to logic, metaphysics, mathematics.

- [Voiceover] And you can see it's highlighting as it reads, so it's helpful to follow along. You can go in to the settings to change the speed as well as the voice. So some students may like it slower or faster in order to follow along. So this can be used in any website in Chrome, as well as Google Docs, if you're writing a document. Something else, you can double-click on any word and press the Dictionary, and the definition will pop up here, the definition of biology. So as the student's reading, they can quickly get a definition of something they may not understand. Another feature that can be used, say a student's doing a research project on Aristotle, and they need some information. So I can highlight here and press one of the highlighted, so I have blue, and say I highlight all the background information on Aristotle in blue, and then say I want to do fun facts in pink. So just as someone's doing research sometimes it's easier to organize based on color. That's how I would do it. So I am gonna do yellow. And then once I'm done highlighting here I can press this circle of Collection Highlights and I can choose to sort by color, which I said that's how I did it, or position in the document. So when I press OK, it's going to extract those highlights into a new Google Doc. So I now have them all here along with the link back to that page, so it's now saved into my Google Drive and I can go back later and do more research or pull those facts out for a paper I may be writing. So those particular features there can support reading and research on the internet. And there are also features to support writing. So I'm just gonna start, I'm gonna get rid of this and start with a blank Google Doc here. So one of the nice features about Read&Write is it has the speech input feature that requires no training. So I can click on the Speech Input button here, and now I'm gonna speak my words. As I speak, comma, the speech input feature is typing what I'm saying period. I use this when I have trouble spelling words like camaraderie and miscellaneous period. It even recognizes more sophisticated words like... Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious exclamation point. Wow, it got that right. So you can see there I even stumbled over my words but it recognized it based on context. So it figured out what I was trying to say there and even had some big words that I know I have difficulty spelling. So a lot of times using the speech input feature it's helpful for students who have difficulty writing. I'm not sure why it's highlighted there, but. Another feature for writing is... Another feature for writing is the word prediction. So this globe on the left of the bar, I can press that... And while I'm typing... You can see the list of words comes up of what it thinks I might be trying to say. So even with that list, if I have trouble choosing I can hover over the word and it'll say it aloud, and if I want that I can click it. And I can keep clicking in this document and that will help me. It recognizes phonetically and contextually, so based on what I'm trying to type it'll give the list of best options to help for my sentences. So this again is the Read&Write Chrome extension with a few other features that I didn't go over, but those are the main ones that a lot of students find helpful. And like I said, especially in higher ed, a lot of colleges offer this software or a similar software like Kurzweil, that is available for students to use at the college level. And something to note, while I open up this other extension here, I'm gonna have Diana explain how the pricing works for this extension.

- [Voiceover] Sure, so Read&Write for Google, as Alyssa mentioned, is a Chrome extension, a Google Chrome extension. It's free for anyone who works at a school as a professional, so anyone working in a college or a K through 12 school that's an educator or a related therapist or counselor can have Read&Write for Google for free for a year unlimited, as far as all of the features to use with your students. Students can have the extension for 30 days to trial, to see if it's something that would really support them throughout K through 12. There's many schools using it, as well as college. If the student only needs text-to-speech with highlighting and a really nice-sounding voice, the text-to-speech feature still stays free after the 30 days. There are many other extensions you can download for free text-to-speech in Google as well, if that's all that the student needs. But the Read&Write is the one that has the synchronized highlighting and a pleasant-sounding voice. We've compared many of them. After the 30 days, if they want the other features other than text-to-speech, there is an annual fee that is $99 a year per student. And if schools purchase it as part of groups or a site license, that's a whole different type of licensing. And as Alyssa mentioned, Read&Write is a product that is available at so many college campuses as a software as well and is available to students. So it's great when students are checking out college campuses, these are some of the questions you wanna ask. What are the assistive technologies you already here have on campus that I'm able to access as a student?

- [Voiceover] Great, thank you. So I'm gonna show one other extension before switching over to Diana's screen. This one is called Readability which is this little red couch that allows you to experience a cleaner reading view. So it's something simple but can really help a lot of students. So you'll see here that I have this article pulled up, Speech Apps to Smart Pens: Tech Aids Students with Learning Disabilities. So I actually have a ad blocker right now, so it blocks a lot of the ads that pop up that we're used to seeing, but even with that, you can see that there's still some distractions on the right. So if you're anything like me, I'll start reading and then look to the right here at this ad and see, "Oh, New 10 SUV's under $25,000, "I could use a new SUV." And I might click on that. So to help with that distraction that many students experience, I can pull up this article and press the red couch and choose Reading Now, and what it will do is eliminate all those distractions and pop ups and give me a clean reading view. So now I can just focus on the text and read comfortably. When it goes to this view I can also, I have the option to, again, change the high contrast or increase the size of the font to a more... Personalized reading view. And I can also use any of the text-to-speech... Any of the text-to-speech extensions you have installed. So I have Read&Write, like Diana said, there are some other free ones as well. Now I can have this clean view but also use my text-to-speech with it.

- [Voiceover] New gadgets and mobile apps introduced in the past few years--

- [Voiceover] Oops, all the way there. So this is, again, just something simple, but that once your student discovers it helps them it's good to have when they're reading anything on the internet. So now I'm gonna switch over to Diana and she'll show you some more extensions that can help in the Chrome browser.

- [Voiceover] Great, thank you. So we're gonna switch from Alyssa's screen over to mine quickly so that I can show you a few more Chrome extensions that your students might find helpful to support them when they're in college. These are also certainly great for students to use in middle school, high school, K through 12, and certainly for that transition to college. And so as Alyssa mentioned, your apps, if you download a Google Chrome app, they're gonna show up on your main app page here. And your extensions show up as the little icons at the top right, which you saw Alyssa clicking on. They're extensions of your browser. You get them both from the Chrome Web Store, they just work a little bit differently. An app works on its own, it works like an app on a tablet, it does its own thing. When you click on it, it launches and does its own thing, and there's a lot of great apps. And these extensions, the reason why they're a symbol to the right of your browser is because typically it affects the internet website that you're on or allows you to interact with that extension in the website that you're on or the Google Doc that you're in. So we've been showing you these on the internet as well as in Google Docs for reading, writing, and research support. And so for your students who may be low vision or have a learning disability and prefer high contrast, there is an extension called High Contrast. My mouse is hovered over it now in the top right. It looks like a circle that's half back and half white. And when you click on High Contrast, you're gonna see the option to enable it. So I'm going to click on Enable. This is a free extension. Many students use things such apps or CTTV's to have this high contrast. This is a free extension that they can use for any website, any document that they pull in through Google Drive and things of that nature. So they can use inverted colors. You can see on the right side on my drop-down menu I have options for increased contrast, gray scale which can be very helpful for those who may prefer gray or who are colorblind, inverted color, inverted gray scale as well as yellow on black. Very similar options, as I mentioned, to a CTTV, very helpful for someone who's low vision, cortical visual impairment, learning disability, some students prefer the high contrast. So, really great that you could use this extension. You can choose to set the default scheme and you can also forget that particular site scheme. So if you want to set it as a default, then each time they go to a website they don't have to keep resetting it, or each time they go to a new document they wouldn't have to keep resetting it. So think about any students, if you're already using Google Drive, many schools are, if you have worksheets or handouts, things like that from instructors or professors that you want to change to high contrast, you just pull it in through Google Drive and you'd be able to use these extensions to do that. So you really can make a lot of materials from the website to documents to worksheets and handouts accessible using these extensions. And again, this one is free. It's called High Contrast, I'm going to disable it. There is a built-in zoom option, as most people are familiar with, on any platform you can use the built-in zoom. But there is an extension called Zoom. There's another one called Zoomy with a Y. This one is Zoom, it's the little Z that my mouse is hovered over in the top right. And it just lets you customize the zoom a little bit better than the built-in zoom. So if I hit the plus, you can see the text starts to get larger. And I can scroll down. I can also set this to be the scheme for websites that I'm on, or I can go back to the default. So together, if the student needs magnification and high contrast, you can use Zoom and High Contrast together if you needed to for a particular student, or the student could be using it themselves. So really great to have these options. Again, both of these are free extensions through that Chrome Web Store. Another great one is called Visor. This is neat for you students who may be using screen masking for keeping track of where they are on the page. Some individuals with learning disabilities or low vision prefer a specific color in the background of the text to make it easier for them to read. So I just clicked on my Visor icon and now you can see you can change the color by increasing the red or the green as well as the blue. You can really set the color as well as the transparency and the size of the tracker that's helping them to keep track of where they are while they're reading. So for your students who may, sometimes you have paper formats that you're doing this, sometimes you're using cutouts for students to use this. So Visor is a great option fo them to be able to use as an extension. And of course, they can shut it off quickly, so they only need to use it as they need it. And again, these extensions work in those documents, handouts, worksheets that they pull in from Google Drive that their instructors or professors may have shared with them, or their teachers. And it also works on the internet while they're reading. Another great extension is called Session Buddy. So Session Buddy is this little blue and white square that I have at the top of my screen here, this little icon. My mouse is hovered over it, and it says, Session Buddy. Many times myself I'm using this professionally, so many people can use this. So a lot of times students are on the internet, they're researching several things, they have documents open, they have presentations open, and then they have to shut down quickly and get to their next class. Especially if they're running across campus, they have no time. They have to shut down, and they're worried that they want to get back to all the things that they were doing before. Maybe they're on a college computer in a lab and they're using all of these websites in their presentations, and they wanna go back to their dorm and use their own tablet or device or laptop. So Session Buddy, if I click on there, it now pulls up the website for anything that I have open, even if it's a presentation or a document, and it lists them, and I can save them. So I can save this session. I just clicked on the Save button. And I typically put in the date and what I'm doing at the time of the session so I can get back to it. And so now you see on the left hand side this session is saved, and I can get back to it just by clicking on it. So if I shut down quickly, I go to my next class or I go to my next thing that I need to do, my next meeting or anything like that, maybe I'm going home or I'm going to the dorm and I click on Session Buddy, and now I want to get back to those websites, and all I need to do is click on any of these links and it will get me back to what I was doing at that time. So Session Buddy is also free. There's similar ones such as OneTab and others that students can use, but free and available in the Chrome Web Store. As far as the apps that they might find useful, definitely explore the apps for mind mapping and brainstorming. There's several like Connected Mind and Mindomo for your student's need to mindmap or brainstorm ideas before writing a paper or a project. Those are free. There's digital homework planners, digital agendas. And so for the students that want to be able to keep track of homework assignments and things like that, those are great apps as well. And so just keep in mind that these apps and extensions, many of them, a great deal of them, are free. And I'm going to have Alyssa take over the screen now because she's going to show you some note taking options and she's going to start sharing her screen to talk about those note taking options.

- [Voiceover] All right, thank you, Diana.

- [Voiceover] While she's loading I just want to mention, I see a question that's down in the chat. We are going to be addressing a lot of the questions at the end of the webinar. Session Buddy would be loaded onto a computer as a Chrome extension. You would download it from the Chrome Web Store and it follows your Google login. So it would work on a laptop, Mac or PC, it would work on a Chromebook, it'll work on Windows tablets. It follows the student based on their Google login. And so if you didn't see how we got to that Chrome Web Store you'll be able to access this video from CTD after this evening, you'll be able to go back and see how we got to that Chrome Web Store to download that Chrome extension.

- [Voicoever] All right, so we mentioned many times note taking options in college are especially, we try to expose students to using technology-based note taking options. So we're gonna show you a couple today, but this is something, again, to look into when looking at the colleges, 'cause a lot of colleges have Livescribe loan out programs. So we have the Livescribe pens that audio record in sync with the written notes, as you can see a picture we have here on our website. These pens can be loaned out. So for instance, at U Conn, we have over 100 and growing pens that get loaned out each semester. And students come in and get trained on them. And they sign a contract about not sharing audio recording, about replacing if it it's broken, because they are covered under the law of audio recording. We put that in their accommodation letters, but a lot, not a lot, sometimes professors may question this and not want to be audio recorded. But know that they are covered under the law. So this is something that can be written into their accommodation letters and they can use in their college classes, as long as they sign an agreement. And many colleges have these programs that equipment gets loaned out. In addition to the Livescribe pen, so this is used with paper for handwritten notes. There are a lot of other audio recording type apps and programs that we're gonna go over. I'm first gonna show you AudioNote. So AudioNote is a... Audio recording note taking program that will sync with your typed notes. What I like about it is that you can get it on a Mac computer, PC, or the Apple or Android devices. So no matter what device you have, you can get it and it's low cost, $5 and under for any of the tablets and MacBook, $19.99 for Windows because it's the only program, one of the only for its kind that is compatible with Windows there. So the way this works is I have this new note here and I'm gonna pretend I'm in chem class, chem 101. And what I'm gonna do before I start taking my notes is I'm gonna press the red button, and this is gonna start audio recording my notes. So now I'm in class, and the professor begins to speak and talk. So the professor says, "We have a test "on Tuesday on chapters three, five, and four. "It is gonna be on the Periodic Table of Elements. "Some elements that you're gonna need to know "for this is magnesium, and sodium. "You're also going to need to know "about this diagram, that's very important, "so don't forget to study it." And I might want to highlight that this is important here. So these are my notes. I just got down key words, and that's something that students, and we like to work with them and talk with students who maybe struggle with note taking, talk to them about these strategies. So if they have trouble keeping up, using these types of programs is a whole different world to them. And we talk about not worrying about getting down every word and doing the outline and only getting the important or key notes down, because you can always go back and listen to what was said. So now what I can do is I can choose anywhere I want in the document, so I'm gonna choose Mg. What did I mean there? I'll press Play.

- [Voiceover] Magnesium and sodium.

- [Voiceover] So you can hear that the recording starts from where I pressed so I don't have to listen to it all over again, and I can also go in and fill in anything I missed. So if I press test here.

- [Voiceover] Test on Tuesday on chapters three, five, and four. It is gonna be on the Periodic Table of Elements.

- [Voiceover] Three, five, and four. So you can see I added that in there later when I went back to listen to it. So for somebody that struggles with taking notes, this is a low cost option that students can use and that it works for them. So I have some students that don't like writing and don't like the Livescribe pen, so we might go over this, or vis versa. So in addition to this, there are also some other options that are out there. So we really like to expose students to different types of options to really choose what works for them. So a couple other options here, I'm gonna pull up the website as Diana explains them.

- [Voiceover] Sure, so some other options for note taking support, some other great apps as well as software programs, one of them is called Notetalker, a really great, simple interface that you can use as an app with simple interface for hitting the audio record button, and you can set bookmarks during important parts. And also take text pictures of what's on the board or something maybe during a field outing or during a lab experiment, and import those pictures to be able to use and to refer back to in your notes. And it's a great way to be able to use a smaller device. You can use it on an iPad or an iPhone. It's very simple for students who like simple audio recording and just being able to bookmark where they heard something important, go back to that, as well as adding pictures to their notes. There's also another one called Sonocent. And so Sonocent Audio works a little bit diffferently as far as bookmarking, based on different colors and different areas of the particular audio recording. So Sonoscent is also an option for students and some particular campuses already have it available for students to use, as well as Notetalker. So certainly check those out, whether you're a campus providing support or whether you're a student or instructor providing support. Sometimes it's really great to be able to get trials of these different types of note taking options, because one note taking support, as far as the technology, whether it's a pen or an app or a software may be better specifically for one student, then another student would prefer another, based on their disability, based on their challenges, based on their strengths and how they learn best. So really great to know that you have options. And so we are going over some of the questions just real quick. I see some questions in the chat coming up in regards to the legality of audio recording. And so I'm going to be sharing my screen to share some options on the iPad, and then we can refer back to those questions regarding the legalities of audio recording. But just note that those accommodations do need to be written into the accommodation letters. At college the laws are similar but different in college as compared to K through 12. And so they are able to use those audio recording devices and apps in college, if they have it written in their accommodation letter. And so I am sharing my screen and I'm going to reflect my iPad so that you can see my iPad and what I want to demonstrate to you as far as options for assistive technology on the iPad. So I'm starting my AirServer so that I can reflect my iPad for you to see as an audience, and so I'll pull it up here. And Alyssa, can you see my iPad well?

- [Voiceover] It is just coming up, yes.

- [Voiceover] Okay, good. Okay, I wanted to know about the delay. Sometimes when I use AirServer there is a delay, so I'll be sure to make sure that the audience can see. So if your students are using an iPad or any other option for an iOS device such an iPad Mini, an iPhone, or even an iPod Touch, what I like to point out first is the accessibility features that are built in to these devices before you even add any apps that can really make these devices accessible for individuals and students with disabilities. So on the bottom of my screen there is my settings icon. I'm just going to click on that. And so you can choose to go into your settings, and on the left-hand side it says General. On the right-hand side is Accessibility. And so the accessibility options that are built into the iPad or iOS devices, again, even if it's a smaller version of the iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, are excellent for students to know and become familiar with before they get in to college because they can use this in conjunction with many of the apps that I'm showing, whether either pulling documents from Google Drive or Dropbox worksheets, handouts, textbooks from some of the resources that Alyssa spoke about, Bookshare is one of them. If they're getting the books in digital format from Access Text Network, typically that's in PDF format and can be used with some of the apps and accessibility features that I'm showing you. Voiceover is the first one. It is the built-in screen reader that allows individuals who are completely blind or low vision that want to have everything read out loud on the screen in order to be able to make their choice. So as a typical individual with sight who's looking at the iPad, we can see the PDF that we want to open. We can see the titles and headings and so forth. And someone who cannot see them would want to hear them read out loud and make that choice to select it. I just went to the bottom of my Accessibility Features to the Accessibility Shortcut. And on here you'll noticce I have several options that I checked off. I put a check mark next to Voiceover, Invert Colors, and Switch Control. That one I'm gonna turn off for right now. I also tend to put Zoom on my accessibility shortcut so that I can turn Zoom on quickly, which is also quickly turned on by a gesture. So note that you can put this on your accessibility shortcuts so that you don't have to keep coming back into your settings to turn these options on. It's just hitting your Home button three times fast on your iPad or iOS device. You hit the Home button three times, one, two, three, and you'll be able to choose which of these features you want to turn on or off. So for example--

- [Voiceover] Excuse me, Diana.

- [Voiceover] Yes.

- [Voiceover] Diana, can you just speak a little louder or turn up your mic, we have some individuals having trouble hearing, if that's okay?

- [Voiceover] Okay, thank you. I will try and speak up, absolutely. Is that better? Or does it sound like I'm louder, hopefully?

- [Voiceover] Still waiting, not, not much. It's a little uneven.

- [Voiceover] My microphone is as loud as it goes, so I will do my best. So while I am on my home screen, if I hit my Home button on my iPad three times fast, I do have this little pop up menu that you can see where I could turn on Voiceover. And I'm going to unmute my screen or my speakers quickly.

- [Voiceover] Photos. Page 105. Calendar. Wednesday. Maps.

- [Voiceover] So an individual using Voiceover can hear the things read out loud on the screen first. They can use the gestures, learn the gestures to go through the pages in the app and double-tap when they want to select something. And that's what's going to be able to access the particular app that they're going to go into at the time. And also note that I can turn off Voiceover very quickly with that same gesture of hitting my Home button three times, one, two, three. And now I get this menu.

- [Voiceover] Accessibility Shortcuts. Selected Voiceover button. Voiceover off.

- [Voiceover] So I can turn Voiceover on and off very quickly as I need it, if I wanted to do that, especiallly for someone who's just beginning to learn to use a voiceover, this is really important for them to be able to do so that, if they're just learning to use Voiceover they're not frustrated by not being able to shut it off, get back in to their settings to turn off the voice, and things like that. The Invert Colors was the other option that I mentioned. When you invert the colors, it does turn to white on black, which doesn't show when I'm in Reflector, but if you have an iPad or a tablet with you and want to try the Invert Colors, it is an excellent way for that built-in high contrast for individuals who need it. So the white on black as well as the high contrast, bright colors on black. And that can take over the entire iPad screen, whether they're in internet, in a document, things of that nature. And then the fifth one down, there's many accessibility features, but I really wanna touch upon some of the ones that really can provide a lot of support for individuals, the Speak Selection and Speak Screen. So again, left-hand side General, right-hand side Accessibility, and then the fifth one down is speech. May be in a different spot if you have not updated your iOS, just so that you're aware. But this is turned off by default. It is turned off by default on all of the iPads and iOS devices. You do need to come in here and turn on Speak Selection and Speak Screen, and you can change the speaking rate from faster to slower, and have that content highlighted and read out loud. So for students with learning disabilities or low vision, or those who just need to have specific information read out loud to them at a specific time. They don't need to have information read out loud to them, all of the information read out loud to them on the iPad for navigation, for example, they just wanna choose specific text that they want to have read out loud. So it actually goes to the Bookshare website as its example. If I get to a website where I'm researching or I need information read out loud, first off all, the built-in pinch zoom is excellent just to increase the font size. But I can press and hold anywhere on the screen now and move these little blue dots to select text. And then you see the third option there is Speak.

- [Voiceover] If you cannot read traditional print books because of a visual impairment, physical disability or severe learning disability, Bookshare can help.

- [Voiceover] So they can have their information read out loud that way. They can also do a finger swipe down on the screen.

- [Voiceover] Bookshare homepage. In Bookshare for me, get start--

- [Voiceover] And you can see the toolbar pops up where they have the Play, the Rewind, and Fast Forward, Slow Down or Speed it Up. They can dock this, they can pull it out if they need to. And this is just like turning on Speak Selection built in to the iPad before adding any apps. So really great for students to know about the accessibility features. Sometimes they don't even realize what their own phone is capable of other than texting and social media. They can use these accessibility features that are built in to iOS device, Android phones and tablets, there's accessibility features in just about every tablet or device that they're using. And really great for them to become familiar with them and how they can use it. Read their text messages aloud, read their emails aloud, use speech input or voice control to send emails or text messages or to dictate into papers and so forth. And I'm gonna show you some of those options with the apps that I'm going to show you. So what I wanna pull up now is a couple of the apps that could be helpful for students in college, especially K through 12 and then transitioning to college. The first one is called Voice Dream Reader, second icon on my screen here. Voice Dream Reader, if you've already been using it, recently had a really great update. And if you're not sure what happened in that update because your app looks very different now, read that What's New. So there is a What's New and the app developer always puts in the important updates that have happened when that occurs. So it opens up to my bookshelf, and what I want to show you in the top left, the Plus sign. You can connect to several different accounts. Google Drive is free to have on the iPad, Dropbox is free, as well as Bookshare. You can pull in those Bookshare books, those digital books. If they're getting a PDF of that book given to them by disability services, they can save that in Dropbox or Google Drive and pull that in to this app, and several others, to have read out loud and to change the text settings, which I'm gonna show you. If they have worksheets, handouts, packets of information, their syllabi, any of those things that they want to save they can scan and save or, if individuals already have it as a digital copy, they can save it in their Google Drive or Dropbox and they can pull it in to this app to be able to access, as well as their books. They can have this in list format if they want it instead of the bookshelf, just by pressing on that bottom icon. And just going to go into a particular book, I'll open up a book here so you can see that there are options in the top right, first of all, to change the speech rate to make the voice faster or slower. And you have many options so since it comes with one voice for free, Heather, and then you have many options for adding voices. There are adult voices, child voices, voices with accents from different countries or different parts of the U.S., even. So they can listen to a sample before they buy it, which is great. So they can listen to that voice and make sure it's something that they're really gonna be comfortable with listening to for a long period of time. And the voices range between $2.99 and $4.99. That's a one time fee, and then they own that voice for as many books or documents that they ever pull into this app. I've had several voices for years now. It's not a recurring fee. And this particular app is $9.99, so 10 bucks. It goes on sale for half price many times throughout the year. And he has never increased that price, even though he keeps continuing to add really great features that support students and individuals with disabilities. So I just went into my text settings. So remember, this is how you can change the text for any book that they're reading, any document or handout. You can choose the font size. So for a student who's low vision or just prefers to have less on the page, up to 90 point you can change that text size. You can also change the font style. Many different font styles available, including the Dyslexie and the OpenDyslexic font, heavier weighted tops and bottoms of letters for some individuals with dyslexia can significantly help improve reading fluency, speed, decoding. And many other font styles available for individuals to choose from. Character spacing and line spacing. You can see when I add spaces between characters and lines, that really opens it up. It makes it easier to get from the end of one line to the beginning of another. Many new options, including Pac-Man mode at the bottom of this. So when it's reading out loud, Pac-Man mode was developed due to research that the app developer did with MIT and Harvard, I believe, and discovering that some students increased reading speed and comprehension if the words disappear after it's read out loud. And so Pac-Man mode does that. And then he also added finger reading speed so that you can have it read aloud as the finger is run underneath the words, if the actual speed is not slowed down enough for a particular student. Lines visible, right now it's five. You can have screen masking, so if too much is available on the page. And then the text-to-speech, so I'm going to make sure that my speakers are not muted and demonstrate text-to-speech.

- [Voiceover] Jumps up and she goes, "Iggy, Iggy, I've got it. "Kimi came, remember, Kimi came."

- [Voiceover] So again, you can change those colors in the color settings. You can change the text color, the background color. So maybe some students want a light color background, you can set that. You can change that color background. You can also change the background to be black, for example, and then go back and change the text color to be something lighter for the students or individuals who need high contrast. You can change the highlight color, all of those things. So very quickly and easily you can provide accessibility for so much text, whether it's a book, or as I've mentioned, if it's a handout or a worksheet and things of that nature. And there is the option for getting definitions, so if you just press and hold on the screen you can get the definition of a word, if you're not familiar. And then there's also the option for taking highlights and sticky notes, which is really helpful. So typically, when a student is reading through a book, they're going to want to highlight important information. They can set that highlight color. They could also leave a sticky note, maybe this is something that they want to remember for a comprehension question for a quiz coming up, and these are audio sticky notes, which are really great. And then the sticky notes are there. The bottom left, you can search by chapter. You could also search by bookmarks, if you create them, the Bookmarks icon on the top right. You can search by your highlights. You can go back through those important highlights. At the very bottom it's 74 of 192, so you can get to a specific page number if you need to. Now I'm on page 56. And the bottom right is that great search feature. So maybe don't remember what page or what chapter, but they remember something important that happened, or they're going to search for a word based on a comprehension question. And they can get back to that particular part of the book. As I mentioned, as I go back to my bookshelf, you can pull in worksheets and handouts and things of that nature from Google Drive if they need access to text-to-speech and so forth. The pictures do remain intact, if you want them. So many different options for accessibility in this one particular app, which is really great, and that's Voice Dream Reader. There's also the option for magnification. I just realized I moved my iPad while I was using it here. So for students that, let me show you the scan first, that may be using their iPad for magnification, whether it's magnification of a document or a book on the go if they don't have it in digital format, or if it's for magnification of the white board when a professor, instructor, or teacher is speaking, they can use the iPad hands-free by using a stand. I'm just pulling up an example here, I just noticed there was an ad. So this is the iClip stand, and this is just one of hundreds that are on the market, but to give you an idea before I show you the magnification app. The iPad can be in this stand, which moves from side to side and up and down, so it holds the iPad for the student so that they don't need to hold it while they're magnifying and trying to zoom in on the white board instruction and see what's being presented, or if they're zooming in to magnify a paper or a handout. So if I start the Better Vision app, for example. If I was trying to--

- [Voiceover] Diana, sorry. So we're having trouble seeing the visual and we can only see the chat box.

- [Voiceover] Oh no, that's not good. How about now?

- [Voiceover] Better.

- [Voiceover] Okay, you can see it? Okay, it's back.

- [Voiceover] Okay.

- [Voiceover] Can you see it, Alyssa? Can you see what I'm presenting?

- [Voiceover] Yes, yes.

- [Voiceover] Okay. All right. So right now I just pulled up the app called Better Vision, and it opens up to four very large high contrast icons, which I like. In the settings, you can choose in that paint palette what they may want to change the color to, such as black and yellow, white on black, a lot of those things that are available on a CCTV, what they're going to be able to change that text color to. Now if I start magnifying by clicking on the magnifying glass, I'm just going to try and zoom in on a handout here or a worksheet that they might have. Again, if it's in the iPad stand, they could be zooming in on the white board or instruction, or maybe it's something that they need to magnify. So they can certainly magnify it. They can move it to see, once they've reached a magnification, they can pause it and move it so that they can see the entire form as it's magnified. And then they can hit that paint palette, so they can use the high contrast as they need to. And this is an app that I believe is $5.99. So if they already have the iPad or iPhone for on the go or iPod Touch, it's a great magnification app. And that one's called Better Vision. ClaroPDF is a great app. It's the last app on my iPad here on the right. ClaroPDF is a great app for access to worksheets and handouts. So for students who need to have handouts or worksheets read out loud, they can pull this in from Google Drive. It's just opening the ClaroPDF app now. They can open it from Google Drive or, on the left-hand side in the top left you'll see, they have the options for Photo to PDF, that fourth one down. So they can pull it in from Google Drive or Dropbox, this particular worksheet or handout, or they just use the app, the camera, rather, on the iPad and take a picture of that worksheet and pull it in real time to be able to work on this worksheet or handout. The top right, they can save it after they've filled it out, but that last option there is Convert PDF. So this has a built-in OCR, optical character recognition. It's going to make this handout worksheet accessible so they can listen to it out loud and type into it as they need to. And so once they convert it, they have the option to go into their settings. They can change the voice that they're going to use, they can change the background color, a lot of great options. And then they use the toolbar, maybe they're gonna use a stylus, change the color and the thickness and so forth. So they can hand write, if they wanted to, especially if this was math, for example. And there's also an eraser if they make a mistake. They can type text into this, which means if they're connected to the internet and they have this built-in speech, they can use the microphone. Speak my answer. So they can use dictation. And there's the built-in word prediction, sorry, lost my words there for a minute, but there's also third-party keyboard. So I'm just tapping on the globe on my keyboard to give the participants and audience an idea that there are other on-screen keyboards that you can use on the iPad now. These are just a few examples. And some great examples that you don't have to use just the built-in keyboard, but you can use keyboards that have text-to-speech and word prediction and other options for students, color coding, different fonts, things like that, magnification. So there's really so many options to provide accessibility using different keyboards as well. Notability and AudioNote, we'll go through these quickly so we make sure that we get back to the rest of the slides. So Alyssa showed you Notability on the computer. It's available on most devices. Not Notability, I'm sorry, AudioNote. AudioNote is something that Alyssa showed you on the computer on her laptop. It's available on laptop, desktop. It's also available on the iPad. Very simple interface to audio record, take notes that sync to the audio recording. It's a nice, simple interface. You can change the paper to graph paper, lined paper, et cetera. You can take pictures, pull in photos, and it does sync the audio recording to the text. So even if a student can't spell or can't take notes while listening at the same time, they can just mark places that are important that they're gonna go back to when they play back that recording. That was AudioNote. Notability is another favorite. Notability is great because you can color-code folders. When you're in a particular class you can start a new note. I always do go in and choose paper so you can put lines, larger lines or smaller lines, you can put a color background, you can use graph paper if you're in math class. And then you start the audio recording. And now if I wanted to type my notes I could start typing. If I wanted to hand write using a stylus or using my finger, certainly I could hand write the note as they're saying something. Maybe they say photosynthesis, for example. I don't know how to spell that, but I'm gonna go back to that. I could highlight it if it's important. Certainly, as I mentioned, if this was math or if they were graphing, they can pull in pictures, they can take a photo of something that's on the board, take a picture of a lab, take a picture of something that's happening out in the field if they're on a field trip, and they can pull in pictures. So even if you pulled in a picture of a worksheet or handout here. There is the eraser if they make a mistake. They can pull in sticky notes and web clips and things like that. There's really a lot that you can do. And then when you play back the recording.

- [Voiceover] I know if I wanted something, maybe they say photosynthesis, for example. They could pull in pictures.

- [Voiceover] So I just was tapping on those part of the notes there that you can see. I might take five pages of notes, but I'm gonna go to page five and tap on that part of the note, and I'm gonna hear exactly what was said at that time. So if I need step-by-step, if I need to add to my notes, if I need to hear what was said at that time, that's a very powerful feature for students to be independent in their note taking. Many others for mind mapping and brain storming, but we do want to, I'm gonna stop sharing right now so we can get back to the rest of our slideshow presentation. So if we get that back over for the audience to see, great. And going to move past our demonstrations. And want to make sure that all of you are aware of other resources on campus for all students. So we showed a lot of great resources that are available for students with disabiiities. Many times the technologies that we showed you are available for all students on campus. Also note that there are study skills and sessions for time management, organization, math support and writing labs. These are available to all students on campus and students can ask their advisers and counselors or check out the website for the college and find out where these study sessions are, where the math support is, where the writing labs are. They can take their essays and have people look at them, help them through that writing process and things like that, which can be really helpful. There's typically TRIO programs on campus for students who are coming from low income or first generation, meaning they're the first person in their family to attend college, maybe their parents don't have the knowledge to help them through all the steps. There's programs for those students as well as Upward Bound, and so forth. And Alyssa has more information on other college support resources.

- [Voiceover] Yeah, so if you need more support, if a student is looking for that extra one-on-one support, many DSS offices offer fee based one-on-one programs. So U Conn, in particular, offers Beyond Access, which is a program that offers above and beyond what the law requires. So there's tracks where students meet with strategy instructors, maybe an hour or three hours a week, depending on the track. And these are with people, grad assistants and doctoral students that have experience working with students with disabilities and can put in that extra effort with them and help them meet their goals. So some colleges offer these programs, and if a students feels that they may need that greater stability that's something to look into prior to choosing a school to go to.

- [Voiceover] Great. And so our contact information is on this particular slide. If anyone wants to contact us for follow up presentations, demonstrations, trainings, assessments, our websites are listed there as well as our contact information. And definitely continue to visit the ctdinstitute.org website for more upcoming trainings and webinars and for a video recording of this webinar so you can go back and pause it and listen to us if you want to listen to what we had to say again. And don't forget to take the survey at the end because that's what's going to give you your certificate of participation and also give us helpful feedback in regards to what you're looking for from a webinar and if this is helpful or beneficial. So we do want to open it up for questions at this time before you get to the evaluation. We wanna make sure that we address any questions. You can put them into the chat at this time if you have any questions based on demonstrations or anything else that you saw.

- [Voiceover] Diana, we do have a question about, "Can Voiceover be used with Notability?"

- [Voiceover] Oh, got you. Some of the notetaking apps like AudioNote and Notability, some of the features are accessible while using Voiceover, and some of the buttons it has a hard time reading. So it's good to check out the different options. We showed two of them, there's other options for note taking available. And I think Louis Perez addressed that as well, that he noticed that some of the buttons in Notability would not be read out loud with Voiceover as well.

- [Voiceover] Perfect. And there was a question about accommodations also applying to the graduate level. And Louis did say that sometimes it's not needed as the typical accommodations aren't always needed because it's a different environment and a different situation, but they do apply. We have many students that are graduate students that get alternate tests in different formats, but it's a different situation, but it does apply.

- [Voiceover] Great.

- [Voiceover] It looks like the audience--

- [Voiceover] Any other questions? For students that have become identified as a student with a disability after high school plan on going to college? Yeah, absolutely, great. So it's wonderful if the student has already been diagnosed with a disability going into college, but certainly students who have never been diagnosed with a disability and get testing either during college or right before college, they can absolutely receive accommodations. Many of the accommodations that we spoke about, including extended time and other things that might be needed for note taking support, assistive technology. So they would just, again, want to register with the disability services office and find out what's available. And again, if you attended the beginning of the presentation, if not, feel free to go back and look at those slides for what types of accommodations they can ask for and what's available, because they really want to be able to speak to what will be helpful for them and why they're asking for it. And check out those free and low cost options for assistive technology now, get them started with trying some options that they might find supportive for them in college.

- [Voiceover] Another question in regards to executive function. Do you recommend trying to use an iPad or is that actually limiting compared to using a Mac in the classroom? So that is a great question, Eleanor. It really depends on the specific student and whether or not they have executive function challenges along with another disability, or what they're already using for technology and what they're comfortable with. So there's a lot of different components that go into that, typically through an assessment. They may use the iPad successfully, they may continue to use thier Mac, depending on what tools and strategies and technologies they're going to be using. But they definitely are able to use those. And if you go to the CTD website where you registered for this webinar, there was an entire webinar that we presented on apps and AT support for executive function. The video recording is available there if you'd like to check that out. It is an hour or an hour and a half specifically geared toward executive function. And you can access that on the CTD website. So we didn't show Bookshare Read to Go, but the Bookshare Read to Go does not allow you, as far as I know, to download more voices other than the two that they have available. The apps that we showed for Bookshare books as well as documents from your Google Drive or Dropbox is called Voice Dream Reader. And so through Voice Dream Reader, if you use that app to access Bookshare books, or documents, you will be able to purchase different voices and use different voices and speeds that we demonstrated this evening. And you would be able to do many other text supports if you needed that using Voice Dream Reader, not only for Bookshare books but also for PDF documents, other things that you might pull in, again, from Google Drive, Dropbox, and other places, ePub. So Voice Dream Reader is another option and allows you to download other voices.

- [Voiceover] To answer Sue about the Google Chrome and iPad app resources we went over, you can see them again through the webinar recording that will be posted. So we don't have an exact list, but if you go to the link that we showed in the beginning, the odf.keene.edu, which is in our PowerPoint, that will have many of the free and low cost resources that we went over as well as links to their website.

- [Voiceover] And thanks for all of the comments and questions. And I believe we're just about up with time, so feel free to follow up. Make sure you take the survey, and our contact information is there if you have any follow up questions as well. And thanks for joining us this evening.

- [Voiceover] Thank you.